frames


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frame

 (frām)
n.
1.
a. A structure that gives shape or support: the frame of a house.
b. The structure or physique of a human or animal body: a worker's sturdy frame.
c. An open structure or rim for encasing, holding, or bordering: a window frame; the frame of a mirror.
2.
a. A closed, often rectangular border of drawn or printed lines.
b. The edge, usually rectangular, delimiting the boundaries of an image.
c. The bounded area of a visual image, as in photography or film: filled the frame with a cast of thousands.
d. One of the set of still images that constitute a film or video.
e. A single image, as in a comic strip or graphic novel, usually bounded by a rectangular line.
f. Computers A rectangular area in which text or graphics can be shown, especially one of several rectangular areas on a web page displaying different documents simultaneously.
3.
a. A general structure or system: the frame of government.
b. A general state or condition: The news put me into a better frame of mind.
c. A frame of reference.
4. The presentation of events in a narrative work, especially a work of literature or film, such that characters in the narrative exist in isolation, uninfluenced by, unaware of, and unable to interact with the narrator or audience.
5. Linguistics
a. The context in which discourse occurs.
b. A pattern for a syntactic construction in which one of a group of words can vary.
6.
a. A round or period of play in some games, such as bowling and billiards.
b. Baseball An inning.
7. often frames A pair of eyeglasses, excluding the lenses: had new lenses fitted into an old pair of frames.
9. Informal A frame-up.
10. Obsolete Shape; form.
v. framed, fram·ing, frames
v.tr.
1.
a. To enclose in a frame: frame a painting.
b. To put together the structural parts of; construct the frame of: frame a house.
2. To conceive or design: framed an alternate proposal.
3. To establish the context for and terminology regarding (a subject of discussion or debate), especially so as to exclude an unwanted point of view: The question was framed to draw only one answer.
4.
a. To put into words; formulate: frame a reply.
b. To form (words) silently with the lips.
5.
a. To make up evidence or contrive events so as to incriminate (a person) falsely.
b. To prearrange (a contest) so as to ensure a desired fraudulent outcome; fix: frame a prizefight.
c. Baseball To catch (a pitch) in such a way as to make it appear to have passed through the strike zone.
v.intr.
Archaic To go; proceed: "Frame upstairs, and make little din" (Emily Brontë).

[Middle English, from framen, to make progress, to frame, from Old English framian, to avail, profit, from fram, forward; see from.]

fram′a·ble, frame′a·ble adj.

frames

(freɪmz)
pl n
the frame for a pair of eyeglasses

frames

The individual still pictures which make up a film.
Translations

frames

npl (for eyeglasses) monturas, armazones mpl, marcos
References in classic literature ?
In spite of her immense age (three, years), it rang between the canon-like frames as a pibroch rings in a mountain pass; the fanners changed their note, and repeated it up in every gallery; and the broad-winged drones, burly and eager, ended it on one nerve-thrilling outbreak of bugles: "La Reine le veult
Its oaken frame has proved stronger than many frames of government
They must look queer in their garish frames on the walls of the peasant house.
A nice workman, who was famous for little curiosities, undertook to make me two chairs, with backs and frames, of a substance not unlike ivory, and two tables, with a cabinet to put my things in.
I noticed, in a heavy frame, one of those depressing
The elaborate character of the frame had made the picture extremely bulky, and now and then, in spite of the obsequious protests of Mr.
But because there is, in man, an election touching the frame of his mind, and a necessity in the frame of his body, the stars of natural inclination are sometimes obscured, by the sun of discipline and virtue.
Froth appeared at the corners of her mouth, and her whole frame trembled.
The surface of the frame was black with what appeared at first sight to be a thick, bubbling fluid of some sort, pouring viscously to and fro as if some hidden fire had been lighted beneath it.
But this would be most evident, if any one could see such a government really established: for it would be impossible to frame such a city without dividing and separating it into its distinct parts, as public tables, wards, and tribes; so that here the laws will do nothing more than forbid the military to engage in agriculture, which is what the Lacedaemonians are at present endeavouring to do.
While in that frame of mind he leaned thoughtlessly against a druggist's show-window, wherein were one hundred and fifty kinds of assorted snakes.
I fancied the discontent of age and disease arose from his family disagreements; as he would have it that it did: really, you know, sir, it was in his sinking frame.