franchisor


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fran·chis·er

or fran·chi·sor  (frăn′chī′zər)
n.
A corporation that grants a franchise, as to a franchisee.

franchisor

(ˈfræntʃaɪzə)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another spelling of franchiser
Translations
franchising-antaja

franchisor

[ˌfræntʃaɪˈzɔːʳ] Nfranquiciador(a) m/f, (compañía f) concesionaria f
References in periodicals archive ?
Participating franchisees who wanted a summary of the results to be mailed to them perceived greater conflict in their relationship with the franchisor and valued the franchisor's expertise more than franchisees who did not evoke an interest to receive the results.
Before you get started, make sure that you go through the franchisor's Uniform Franchise Offering Circular, a legal document that provides the information needed to evaluate the franchisor.
To test the need-based perspective of franchisee interest in academic research the working hypotheses for this study are: H1 Franchisees who request a summary of the results to be mailed to them perceive greater levels of conflict in their relationship with the franchisor than franchisees who do not request the results of the study.
Ninety-six per cent of franchisers and 85pc of franchisees agree that technology was increasingly important to their business helping to reduce workload and aid franchisor communications.
Misunderstandings can sour the relationship for both franchisor and franchisee.
The purpose of this analysis is to review case law developments where franchisors have been found liable to others who have been injured by merchandise or services that are identified by the franchisor's trademark or trade name.
(i) in which goods or services are sold or offered for sale or are distributed under a marketing or business plan prescribed in substantial part by the franchisor or its associate;
These costs must be disclosed if they are within the knowledge or the control of the franchisor or are reasonably foreseeable by the franchisor.
After the franchise development department and legal department finalize a new country license agreement and the initial fees are paid, the real work begins for both the franchisor and the new country area licensee or master franchisee.
While it is true that a franchisor will franchise his business for profit, this is not the reason for being.
The Texas Labor Code has been amended to provide that a franchisor is not considered an employer for claims related to employment discrimination, wage payment, the Texas Minimum Wage Act, and the Texas Workers' Compensation Act, among other laws.
Franchising continues to be a popular model for regional expansion for many good reasons; a franchisor can expand its business quickly into a growing economy while mitigating some of the commercial risks and significant capital investment that are often associated (and justifiably so) with establishing a presence "on the ground" directly.