freeganism


Also found in: Wikipedia.

freeganism

a political philosophy that opposes over-consumption and waste

free·gan

 (frē′gən)
n.
A person who regularly gathers and eats food that businesses have thrown out.

[Blend of free and vegan.]

free′gan·ism n.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He also reluctantly re-enters the teaching profession, while Jo embraces freeganism.
In this episode, Dan reluctantly re-enters the teaching profession, while Jo embraces "freeganism".
In episode two, Dan Greg reluctantly re-enters the teaching profession, while Jo embraces freeganism. Thanks to a terrific script by Davies and Ed Gamble, this should brighten the dullest autumn night.
He also reluctantly re-enters the teaching profession, while Jo embraces freeganism. Thanks to a terrific script by Davies and Ed Gamble, this should brighten the dullest autumn night.
Freeganism, influenced by the anti-globalisation movement of the 1990s and organisations such as Food Not Bombs, began as an attempt to engage in direct protest and symbolic practice, exposing the drivers of capitalism while simultaneously enacting the possibility of a new world.
Some individuals practice freeganism: instead of buying food, they do "dumpster diving", salvaging discarded but still edible food from bins.
Similarly, Freeganism, a consumer resistance movement embracing anticonsumption activities such as dumpster diving and the consumption of disposed goods as ethical acts of consumer agency, fits within the Agency and Empowerment discourse (Nguyen, Chen, and Mukherjee 2013; Papaoikonomou, Cascon-Pereira, and Ryan 2014; Pentina and Amos 2011).
The topics covered in these texts include: "the drift" in walking--an art historical technique used to resist consumerist tendencies to move productively and efficiently through space; smartphone apps that generate inefficient paths and serendipitous moments in navigating from one place to another; and freeganism, or consuming without spending money.
For example, a number of scholars have underscored the significance of reinvigorated provisioning practices outside mainstream market channels for furthering more sustainable forms of consumption, interpreting activities such as freecycling, repair and reuse networks, freeganism, and other do-it-yourself (DI Y) endeavors as expressions of political participation, ecological citizenship, and ethics (DeLind, 2002; Seyfang, 2006).
more closely resembles the short videos in style, and, in particular, shares the aesthetics of many grassroots videos about Freeganism: the camera follows a group as they dive for food and prepare it back at home; throughout, the subjects directly address the camera to describe what they are doing and why.
It covers topics such as freeganism, food additives, fair trades and air miles.
Consequently, as other commentators have pointed out, abandonment has important implications for 'freeganism'.