freewoman


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freewoman

(ˈfriːˌwʊmən)
n, pl -women
1. a woman who is free or at liberty, esp one who is not a slave or serf
2. a woman who has been granted the freedom of a town, city, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.freewoman - a person who is not a serf or a slave
citizen - a native or naturalized member of a state or other political community
freedman, freedwoman - a person who has been freed from slavery
References in periodicals archive ?
She was a parish councillor for 33 years and her dedicated service to the residents of the village was recognised in 2017 when she was made a Freewoman of Rothbury.
Her contribution to the parish council and her dedicated service to the residents of Rothbury was recognised by Rothbury Parish Council in 2017 when she was made a Freewoman of Rothbury.
Mayor of Oswestry, Councillor John Price, said: "Being appointed a Freeman or Freewoman of your town is a huge honour and it is in place to recognise those who have given extensive and distinguished service to the community.
The Welsh music legend, 82, will be made an honorary freewoman of the city and county of Cardiff at a ceremony at City Hall on Friday.
Frustrated with the hierarchy and lack of class representation within the WSPU, Dora began publishing journals called The Freewoman, which provided a wider range of women's voices on the Suffragette movement.
(6) She also wrote for The Freewoman, a radical feminist journal
We are not certain whether Lydia was a freewoman or a slave, a widow or divorcee.
Bertha Coats was interested in many areas of welfare in the community but particularly with the wellbeing of children and she was recognised for this becoming a Freewoman of Paisley.
In "The Outsider as Editor: Three Guineas and the Feminist Periodical," Alyssa Mackenzie uses Woolf's writing about establishing a feminist journal that never came into print as a springboard for her study of how that imagined journal nonetheless illuminates some of the author's ideas about ideal conditions for disseminating polemics that are informed by her encounters with periodicals of her time, particularly Time and Tide, The Freewoman, and The New Freewoman.
In late 1911, the radicalism of a new journal called The Freewoman caused a stir inside the feminist movement.
As examples of this marginalization: the magazine The New Freewoman lost all political feminist message once Pound transformed it into The Egoist (Frost 2003; 169); the anthology New American Poetry by Donald Allen included only four contemporary experimental women poets (Keller and Miller 2005; 84); Beat women participated in the edition of many avant-garde magazines but were eclipsed by their male co-editors (Friedman 1998: 231).
Writing in The Freewoman in 1912, Rebecca West--herself a supporter of women's suffrage--denounced with characteristic acerbity the increasing popularity of "degradations of the drama written by propagandists," complaining that "the public taste has already been so perverted that dislocated Suffrage speeches...