freewrite

free·writ·ing

 (frē′rī′tĭng)
n.
A writing exercise in which a person writes quickly and continuously, with a free association of ideas, especially as a means of initiating a more focused composition.

free′write′ intr.v.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

freewrite

(ˈfriːˌraɪt)
vb (tr) , -writes, -writing, -wrote or -written
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) to write (something) freely without stopping or thinking
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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I kept a close eye on it through its Kickstarter campaign, its agonising lead up to production, through its rebranding to the Astrohaus Freewrite, right on through to unboxing videos and other reviews online.
After all, in a freewrite, there is no need for structure or organization; you do not have to know what you are talking about, nor spell things correctly--and you do not need to begin, progress, and conclude.
For the prewriting assignment, students chose to complete either a traditional freewrite activity or a graphic organizer based on their selected essay topics.
Our questionnaire included 21 items that allowed for both selected (responders choose responses from a list) and constructed (responders freewrite responses) responses around the five themes described in our conceptual framework.
Keeping a journal is an excellent way to get that extra writing in, whether you simply freewrite about your day or whether you have certain questions or themes to address.
In my own work TAPs have functioned to uncover underlying patterns and thoughts much in the same way that a "freewrite" (continuous writing for a period of time without stopping or editing) does (Elbow, 1991).
In response to students' concerns about writing, many teachers and scholars scaffold assignments in such a way that students have opportunities to freewrite their own ideas and summarize central texts before they move forward toward a deeper level of analysis (Danielewicz & Elbow, 2009; Perl, 1994).
"Reflections on Being a Writing Mentor." Freewrite .
For an optional, ungraded assignment, students could write (in any shape or format, length, including freewrite, poems, stream of consciousness, etc.) and share (anonymously if they chose) anything they wanted to communicate about Gerardo's response, the experience of surviving violence, or the issue of intimate violence.
After reading this description, I prompted them to freewrite, asking them, "How are you queer?" Knowing my in-class instructional routines, the students had been poised to write, pencils and pens at the ready.
Once she was convinced that students had a clear understanding of the concepts, she then invited them to "freewrite" an essay on any of the topics in the course that they found especially stimulating.