friar


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fri·ar

 (frī′ər)
n. Abbr. Fr.
A member of a usually mendicant Roman Catholic order.

[Middle English frere, from Old French, from Latin frāter, brother; see bhrāter- in Indo-European roots.]

fri′ar·ly adj.

friar

(ˈfraɪə)
n
(Christian Churches, other) a member of any of various chiefly mendicant religious orders of the Roman Catholic Church, the main orders being Black Friars (Dominicans), Grey Friars (Franciscans), White Friars (Carmelites), and Austin Friars (Augustinians). See also Black Friar, Grey Friar, White Friar, Augustinian
[C13 frere, from Old French: brother, from Latin frāter brother]
ˈfriarly adj

fri•ar

(ˈfraɪ ər)

n.
a man who is a member of one of the mendicant religious orders founded in the Middle Ages, as the Carmelites, Franciscans, or Dominicans.
[1250–1300; Middle English frier, frere brother < Old French frere < Latin frāter brother]
fri′ar•ly, adj.
monk, friar - A monk stays in a monastery; a friar does not.
See also related terms for monk.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.friar - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on almsfriar - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on alms
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
Carmelite, White Friar - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the white cloak of the Carmelite order; mendicant preachers
Black Friar, Blackfriar, Dominican, friar preacher - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the black mantle of the Dominican order
Franciscan, Grey Friar - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the grey habit of the Franciscan order
Augustinian - a Roman Catholic friar or monk belonging to one of the Augustinian monastic orders

friar

noun monk, brother, religious, prior, abbot He is a travelling Franciscan friar.
Translations

friar

[ˈfraɪəʳ] Nfraile m; (before name) → fray m
black friardominico m
grey friarfranciscano m
white friarcarmelita m

friar

[ˈfraɪər] nmoine m, frère m

friar

nMönch m; Friar JohnBruder John; Black FriarsDominikaner pl; Grey FriarsFranziskaner pl; White FriarsKarmeliter pl

friar

[ˈfraɪəʳ] nfrate m
References in classic literature ?
Quoth Robin, "Now will I go to seek this same Friar of Fountain Abbey of whom we spake yesternight, and I will take with me four of my good men, and these four shall be Little John, Will Scarlet, David of Doncaster, and Arthur a Bland.
Now, good uncle," quoth Will Scarlet at last, when they had walked for a long time beside this sweet, bright river, "just beyond yon bend ahead of us is a shallow ford which in no place is deeper than thy mid-thigh, and upon the other side of the stream is a certain little hermitage hidden amidst the bosky tangle of the thickets wherein dwelleth the Friar of Fountain Dale.
But his crown was shorn as smooth as the palm of one's hand, which, together with his loose robe, cowl, and string of beads, showed that which his looks never would have done, that he was a friar.
The friar took Robin Hood on his back, Deep water he did bestride, And spake neither good word nor bad, Till he came at the other side.
There lives a curtall friar in Fountain's Abbey--Tuck, by name--who can beat both him and you," he said.
By our Lady," he said, "I'll neither eat nor drink till I see this same friar.
St Dunstan knew, as well as any one, the prerogatives of a jovial friar.
I'll give thee, good fellow, a twelvemonth or twain, To search Europe through, from Byzantium to Spain; But ne'er shall you find, should you search till you tire, So happy a man as the Barefooted Friar.
Dunbar himself knew that he had no calling to be a friar or preacher.
So after a time we find him no longer a friar, but a courtier.
No soft words with me, for I know you, lying rabble," said Don Quixote, and without waiting for a reply he spurred Rocinante and with levelled lance charged the first friar with such fury and determination, that, if the friar had not flung himself off the mule, he would have brought him to the ground against his will, and sore wounded, if not killed outright.
Sancho Panza, when he saw the friar on the ground, dismounting briskly from his ass, rushed towards him and began to strip off his gown.