fricative


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Related to fricative: Voiced fricative

fric·a·tive

 (frĭk′ə-tĭv)
n.
A consonant, such as f or s in English, produced by the forcing of breath through a constricted passage. Also called spirant.
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a fricative consonant.

[New Latin fricātīvus, from Latin fricātus, past participle of fricāre, to rub.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fricative

(ˈfrɪkətɪv)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a continuant consonant produced by partial occlusion of the airstream, such as (f) or (z)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) relating to or denoting a fricative
[C19: from New Latin fricātivus, from Latin fricāre to rub]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fric•a•tive

(ˈfrɪk ə tɪv)
n.
1. a consonant sound, as (th), (v), or (h), characterized by audible friction produced by forcing the breath through a constricted or partially obstructed passage in the vocal tract.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to a fricative.
[1855–60; < Latin fricāt(us), past participle of fricāre; see friction]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fricative - a continuant consonant produced by breath moving against a narrowing of the vocal tract
continuant, continuant consonant - consonant articulated by constricting (but not closing) the vocal tract
sibilant, sibilant consonant - a consonant characterized by a hissing sound (like s or sh)
Adj.1.fricative - of speech sounds produced by forcing air through a constricted passage (as `f', `s', `z', or `th' in both `thin' and `then')
soft - (of speech sounds); produced with the back of the tongue raised toward the hard palate; characterized by a hissing or hushing sound (as `s' and `sh')
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
frikativa
frikativstrujniktjesnačnik
frikativa

fricative

[ˈfrɪkətɪv]
A. ADJfricativo
B. Nfricativa f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fricative

adjReibe-; fricative consonantReibelaut m
nReibelaut m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fricative

[ˈfrɪkətɪv] n (Ling) → fricativa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Beginning and ending exercise patterns with a sibilant, fricative, or plosive produced positive results immediately.
(4) In addition, there would be no consonantal trace of the Aramaic voiced pharyngeal fricative /7 in the Akkadian word, which would be unexpected based on other Aramaic loanwords in Akkadian.
Bilabialization, lateralization, changes in voice characteristics, and active nasal fricative sound production errors were each seen at a rate of 6%.
The fricative's malcontents: lips, teeth & tongue.
The following example shows metathesis in Balochi in which fricative exchanges its position with labial stop.
Equally problematic is the rendering of the voiceless palatal fricative, so common in Sicilian vernaculars, with the grapheme h.
When people say: "Let's meet at 8 o'clock" (and any earlier, by the way, is passive-aggressive nonsense from smug, child-free, independently wealthy, non-train-reliant types who just want you to compare their sleek, fatted existence with the fricative, withered thing you barely any more call life), it comes with pages of unspoken caveats.
But because few other English words ended in the consonant cluster \kth\, the second sound lost its fricative quality and became a simple \t\, remaining so even after the \k\ sound had been lost.
But return to the cadence of the inscrutable "ink-thunder and word-murder," or the fricative crack of "seven eyes suck silk, fog, ink, foam": These are turns of phrase that want to be read aloud, that ask to be held by the tongue and thrown against the teeth.