friction match


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friction match

n.
A match that ignites when struck on an abrasive surface.

friction match

n
(General Physics) a match that ignites as a result of the heat produced by friction when it is struck on a rough surface. See also safety match

match1

(mætʃ)

n.
1. a slender piece of wood or other flammable material tipped with a chemical substance that produces fire when rubbed on a rough or chemically prepared surface.
2. a wick, cord, or the like, prepared to burn at an even rate, used to fire cannon, gunpowder, etc.
[1350–1400; Middle English macche wick < Middle French meiche]

match2

(mætʃ)

n.
1. a person or thing that equals or resembles another in some respect.
2. a person or thing able to deal with another as an equal: to meet one's match.
3. a person or thing that is an exact counterpart of another.
4. a corresponding, suitably associated, or harmonious pair.
5.
a. a game or contest in which two or more contestants or teams oppose each other.
b. a contest consisting of a specific number of sets: a tennis match.
6. any contest or competition that resembles a sports match: a shouting match.
7. a person considered with regard to suitability as a partner in marriage: a good match.
8. a matrimonial union; marriage.
v.t.
9. to equal: to match his score.
10. to be the match or counterpart of: The skirt matches the jacket.
11. to cause to correspond: to match actions and beliefs.
12. to fit together.
13. to place in opposition or conflict.
14. to provide with an adversary or competitor of equal power: The teams were well matched.
15. to encounter as an adversary with equal power.
16. to prove a match for.
17. to unite in marriage; procure a matrimonial alliance for.
18.
a. to toss (coins) into the air and then compare the matching or contrasting sides that land facing up.
b. to match coins with.
v.i.
19. to be equal or suitable.
20. to correspond: These gloves do not match.
[before 900; Old English gemæcca mate]
match′a•ble, adj.
match′er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.friction match - lighter consisting of a thin piece of wood or cardboard tipped with combustible chemicalfriction match - lighter consisting of a thin piece of wood or cardboard tipped with combustible chemical; ignites with friction; "he always carries matches to light his pipe"; "as long you've a lucifer to light your fag"
fuzee, fusee - a friction match with a large head that will stay alight in the wind
kitchen match - a wooden friction match that will light on any granular surface; useful to light wood or gas stoves
igniter, ignitor, lighter, light - a device for lighting or igniting fuel or charges or fires; "do you have a light?"
matchstick - a short thin stick of wood used in making matches
book matches, safety match - a paper match that strikes only on a specially prepared surface
slow match - match or fuse made to burn slowly and evenly
References in periodicals archive ?
We have seen 200 years of worldleading innovation in the North East, but like the world's first friction match, which was invented in Stockton in 1826, only a mixture of the right ingredients will ensure our talent keeps shining long into the future.
the friction match With a keen interest in trying to find a means of obtaining fire easily, John Walker invented the friction match in 1827.
A Apike B A friction match C A policeman D An arsonist QUESTION 4 - for 4 points: Which of the following is a highly infectious disease of dogs?
Once you get the shimming set correctly, you'll find your scope is much easier to control and has a good friction match between altitude and azimuth.
The first friction match (or wooden kitchen match) was invented in merry old England in 1827.
1826: Englishman John Walker invented the friction match.
Even so, after reading of the pioneering days of my ancestors, it seems a pretty soft luxury to be able to light an oil lamp with a friction match and have the lamp bright enough to read by and stay lit for as long as I choose to read.
In 1831, however, a French chemist, Charles Sauria, produced the first practical friction match.