frictionally


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fric·tion

 (frĭk′shən)
n.
1. The rubbing of one object or surface against another.
2. Conflict, as between persons having dissimilar ideas or interests; clash.
3. Physics A force that resists the relative motion or tendency to such motion of two bodies or substances in contact.

[Latin frictiō, frictiōn-, from frictus, past participle of fricāre, to rub.]

fric′tion·al adj.
fric′tion·al·ly adv.

frictionally

(ˈfrɪkʃənəlɪ)
adv
in a frictional manner
References in periodicals archive ?
The FEW process is frictionally dependent; until enough heat is generated to plasticize the fastener, the process will not progress past the cleaning step (2).
"Frictionally Excited Thermoelastic Instability Indisc Brakes -Transient Problem in the Full Contact Regime." International Journal of Mechanical Sciences 49 (2): 129-137.
Observations of the three-dimensional thermodynamic fields might also prove to be crucial for assessing the contribution of frictionally generated horizontal vorticity to the development of vortices in convective storms.
They observe that the "continuous turnover in housing occupancy necessitates a minimum number of vacant units which may be described as frictionally vacant units." (8) The presence of frictional vacancy has been accepted by analysts as being a necessary ingredient to an efficient market.
'The conviction, which runs, for example, through almost all Professor Pigou's work, that money makes no real difference except frictionally and that the theory of production and employment can be worked out (like Mill's) as being based on 'real' exchanges with money introduced perfunctorily in a later chapter, is the modern version of the classical tradition.' (Keynes op.
Part 2: Proper orthogonal modal modeling of a frictionally excited beam, Nonlinear Dynamics 23: 1-11.
The conviction, which runs, for example, through almost all Professor Pigou's work, that money makes no real difference except frictionally and that the theory of production and employment can be worked out (like Mill's) as being based on "real" exchanges with money introduced perfunctorily in a later chapter, is the modern version of the classical tradition.
Indeed, a true measure of unemployment should eliminate counting those people who are considered 'frictionally unemployed' as their unemployment experience should in most cases be quite ephemeral.
A piezo motor uses the ultrasonic vibrations (greater than 20 kHz) of a "stator" structure that is frictionally coupled to a moving slide or rotating shaft.