frisking


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frisk

 (frĭsk)
v. frisked, frisk·ing, frisks
v.tr.
To search (a person) for something concealed, especially a weapon, by passing the hands quickly over clothes or through pockets.
v.intr.
To move about briskly and playfully; frolic.
n.
1. The act of frisking someone.
2. An energetic, playful movement; a gambol.

[From Middle English frisk, lively, from Old French frisque, of Germanic origin.]

frisk′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frisking - the act of searching someone for concealed weapons or illegal drugsfrisking - the act of searching someone for concealed weapons or illegal drugs; "he gave the suspect a quick frisk"
search, hunting, hunt - the activity of looking thoroughly in order to find something or someone
strip search - searching someone for concealed weapons or illegal drugs by having them remove their clothes
Translations
References in classic literature ?
I saw one day a herd of a dozen bullocks and cows running about and frisking in unwieldy sport, like huge rats, even like kittens.
Tom watched and watched, hoping whenever a frisking frock came in sight, and hating the owner of it as soon as he saw she was not the right one.
About them frisking playd All Beasts of th' Earth, since wilde, and of all chase In Wood or Wilderness, Forrest or Den; Sporting the Lion rampd, and in his paw Dandl'd the Kid; Bears, Tygers, Ounces, Pards Gambold before them, th' unwieldy Elephant To make them mirth us'd all his might, & wreathd His Lithe Proboscis; close the Serpent sly Insinuating, wove with Gordian twine His breaded train, and of his fatal guile Gave proof unheeded; others on the grass Coucht, and now fild with pasture gazing sat, Or Bedward ruminating: for the Sun Declin'd was hasting now with prone carreer To th' Ocean Iles, and in th' ascending Scale Of Heav'n the Starrs that usher Evening rose: When SATAN still in gaze, as first he stood, Scarce thus at length faild speech recoverd sad.
As I sat quietly meditating at my table, I heard something bounce in at the closet-window, and skip about from one side to the other: whereat, although I was much alarmed, yet I ventured to look out, but not stirring from my seat; and then I saw this frolicsome animal frisking and leaping up and down, till at last he came to my box, which he seemed to view with great pleasure and curiosity, peeping in at the door and every window.
In short, it seemed as though mirth and gaiety were frisking and gambolling all over the meadow.
When they saw me the silly blubbering fellows began frisking round me as calves break out and gambol round their mothers, when they see them coming home to be milked after they have been feeding all day, and the homestead resounds with their lowing.
I remember how, when a little girl at school, I used to go home on Sundays and spend the time in frisking and dancing about.
Nevertheless, the men went safely across the lawn with the wild beasts frisking about them, and doing no manner of harm; although, as they mounted the steps of the palace, you might possibly have heard a low growl, particularly from the wolves; as if they thought it a pity, after all, to let the strangers pass without so much as tasting what they were made of.
When they were turned out in the morning, the first moments of freedom from the confinement of the pen were spent in frisking and gambolling.
Hetty's was a spring-tide beauty; it was the beauty of young frisking things, round-limbed, gambolling, circumventing you by a false air of innocence--the innocence of a young star- browed calf, for example, that, being inclined for a promenade out of bounds, leads you a severe steeplechase over hedge and ditch, and only comes to a stand in the middle of a bog.
Then Garm began to tremble; then he barked; and then he leaped up at me, frisking and wagging his tail.
Beggars in their rags, and Kings trailing the regal purple in the dust; the Warrior's gleaming helmet; the Priest in his sable robe; the hoary Grandsire, who has run life's circle and come back to childhood; the ruddy School-boy with his golden curls, frisking along the march; the Artisan's stuff jacket; the Noble's star-decorated coat;--the whole presenting a motley spectacle, yet with a dusky grandeur brooding over it.