frisson


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fris·son

 (frē-sōN′)
n. pl. fris·sons (-sōNz′, -sōN′)
A moment of intense excitement; a shudder: The story's ending arouses a frisson of terror.

[French, from Old French fricons, pl. of fricon, a trembling, from Vulgar Latin *frīctiō, *frīctiōn-, from Latin frīgēre, to be cold.]

frisson

(frisɔ̃)
n
a shudder or shiver; thrill
[C18 (but in common use only from C20): literally: shiver]

fris•son

(friˈsõʊ̃)

n.
a passing sensation of excitement; thrill.
[1770–80; < French: shiver, shudder, Old French friçons (pl.) < Late Latin frictiōnem, acc. of frictiō shiver (taken as derivative of frīgēre to be cold), Latin: massage, friction]

frisson

A French word meaning a shiver, used to mean a thrill or sensation of excitement or fear.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frisson - an almost pleasurable sensation of frightfrisson - an almost pleasurable sensation of fright; "a frisson of surprise shot through him"
fear, fearfulness, fright - an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
Translations

frisson

[ˈfriːsɒn] N [of horror, fear] → repelús m; [of excitement] → escalofrío m

frisson

[ˈfriːsɒn frisɔ̃] (literary) nfrisson m

frisson

n (= thrill)Schauer m
References in periodicals archive ?
The work's openness to such disparate readings might provoke an ambivalent frisson, of course, but it seems to offer itself up to that without resistance.
It's basically a whole new campus,'' said Kent Frisson, the district's assistant superintendent of business.
He appreciates the area's sense of possibility, even when this carries with it a frisson of danger.
Bill McDermott, Castaic Union School District's chief business officer, and Kent Frisson, assistant superintendent of business services for the Sulphur Springs School District, each will finish five-year stints this summer.
It's a conservative estimate compared with the 172 cited by demographers, said Kent Frisson, assistant superintendent of business.
This automatic/associative frisson constituted the whole content of the films, which accordingly got pretty tedious.
I can only imagine the frisson at the Beverly Hills opening.
This frisson disappears in the oil paintings, which are larger and less luminous and thus not so ineffably risque.
The scenes between Hershey and Campbell suffer from a curious lack of frisson.
Sophie Calle is a storyteller who insinuates herself into the lives of her (at times unwilling, at times unwitting) subjects; the frisson derives from her intense engagement.
Romantic frisson is provided by Dice (Max Beesley), a presumably hip club DJ who thrusts Billie on her road to stardom.
De Monchaux takes her fetishes seriously, and if they offer more frisson than jouissance, that is perhaps only appropriate, given their status as fantasies.