front row


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front row

n (functioning as singular or plural)
(Rugby) rugby union
a. the forwards at the front of a scrum
b. (as modifier): perhaps the finest front-row forward in the world.
References in classic literature ?
The front row of the men she had squeezed past, because of their paper and pencils, she decided to be reporters from the local papers up-town.
"I can now," said he to himself, "fancy the whole row of ladies and gentlemen sitting there in the front row; if one could but see into their hearts--yes, that would be a revelation--a sort of bazar.
Vronsky, seeing his cousin from his stall in the front row, did not wait till the entr'acte, but went to her box.
Children ventured into the room and ogled her, as if they formed the front row at a theatre.
Profiting by the different movements in the crowd, he had managed by degrees to gain the front row of spectators.
Slowly, inch by inch, I pressed in with the crowd, moving nearer and nearer to the great glass screen that parts the dead from the living at the Morgue--nearer and nearer, till I was close behind the front row of spectators, and could look in.
Then he drew back and delivered a kick of such titanic vigor that it lifted Tom clear over the footlights and landed him on the heads of the front row of the Sons of Liberty.
The crowd unexpectedly found itself so close to the Emperors that Rostov, standing in the front row, was afraid he might be recognized.
Then the people begun to flock in, and the beats and the girls took seats in the front row at the head of the coffin, and for a half an hour the people filed around slow, in single rank, and looked down at the dead man's face a minute, and some dropped in a tear, and it was all very still and solemn, only the girls and the beats holding handkerchiefs to their eyes and keep- ing their heads bent, and sobbing a little.
Lastly, Ophelia was a prey to such slow musical madness, that when, in course of time, she had taken off her white muslin scarf, folded it up, and buried it, a sulky man who had been long cooling his impatient nose against an iron bar in the front row of the gallery, growled, "Now the baby's put to bed let's have supper!" Which, to say the least of it, was out of keeping.
I looked first at the pe rsons who occupied the front row of seats in the gallery stalls.
The manager, later, sat down in the front row of the public seats.