front-page

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front-page

(frŭnt′pāj′)
adj.
Worthy of coverage on the front page of a newspaper: front-page news.
tr.v. front-paged, front-pag·ing, front-pag·es
To place or report on the front page of a newspaper.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

front-page

n
(Journalism & Publishing) (modifier) important or newsworthy enough to be put on the front page of a newspaper
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

front′-page′



adj., v. -paged, -pag•ing. adj.
1. of major importance; worth putting on the first page of a newspaper.
v.t.
2. to run (copy) on the front page of a newspaper.
[1900–05, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

front-page

[ˌfrʌntˈpeɪdʒ]
B. CPD front-page news Nnoticias fpl de primera plana
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

front-page

[ˈfrʌntˌpeɪdʒ] adj (news, article) → di prima pagina
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
'Front-page stuff!' said Roscoe Sherriff, with gleaming eyes.
USA Today was the only paper studied that included references, bylines or photos of women in all its front-pages every day in February.
Most of the front-page stories were written by men (67%), as were the oped or equivalent pieces (72%).
There was an increase in the number of women appearing in front-page photographs, up to 39% from 34% in 1993, the most since the survey began.
The Daily Camera of Boulder, Colo., had the most front-page (39%) and local-page (43%) references to women among the newspapers surveyed, and it featured the most women (56%) in front-page photos.
Scoting last in front-page references was the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial with only 17%.
Newsroom anthropologists have closely explored the social, cultural, political, economic, and interpersonal forces that shape editorial decision making and front-page prioritization (Broder, 2000; Forrest, 1934; Gans, 1979).
Researchers employing similar methods have, over time, developed key metrics including number of articles, number of column lines, number of editorials, number of front-page articles, and column inches.
Wolfe, Boydstun, and Baumgartner (2009) analyzed Boydstun's data and found that front page coverage is more likely to repeat topics that were covered on the previous day, as compared to full-paper coverage (a characteristic they describe as "friction.") They also found some important differences between the topics that dominate the front page and those that occupy full-paper coverage, although overall they note a strong positive correlation (r = 0.78) between front-page coverage and full paper coverage of any given topic (Wolfe et al., 2009).
Comparing the topics of front-page and full-paper stories in the New York Times.
New York Times Articles Column inche Front-page articles Victims No.