frontality

Related to frontality: ostiate, articulite

frontality

(frənˈtælɪtɪ)
n
(Art Terms) fine arts a frontal view, as in a painting or other work of art
References in periodicals archive ?
He covers the communicative viewpoint: photography, frontality, and multiplicity during the 1800s; the beholder in motion: kinetic viewership; and the body physical, the body politic: incorporated viewership during the 1960s.
As I have argued elsewhere, the proscenium arch strategically altered the perceptual relation between spectator and actor, it inflected the conventions of frontality in performance and altered the narrative structures of plays.
(1) On it, photographs are posted that replicate Anderson's use of symmetrical framing and 'frontality', a formal composition of visual elements whereby characters and objects stare back at us 'dead-on'.
The alloverness of the later Accumulations contributes to the radical frontality and superficiality of the works; it enhances their pictorial nature.
Despite the lofty, often majestic appearance apparent in sculpture such as Portal and Journey of the Ferryman (2015), both works testify to the artist's durable understanding of frontality as a kind of architectural facade that provokes an analysis of the elements housed within and the support structure that gives further credibility to why these forms exist and how they are linked to one another.
The sculptures' mute frontality led Convert to think of Fayum portraits; though the comparison is unexpected, it is easy to appreciate.
(13) The authors examine the characteristics of Cubist paintings--such as frontality, suppression of depth, and contraction of space--and demonstrate their application to architecture in terms of phenomenal transparency.
This piece possesses elements of Egyptian frontality and diverse geometric forms.
British painters hung on spatial illusion, whereas flatness and frontality came naturally to the Americans.
This frontality and the intense use of closeups channel the spectator to identify with Mosab and Gonen, and thus accept the "insane change," as Gonen calls it.
With the simple frontality and the large window openings of their main facade on the public space, the dwellings project a strong presence.
In addition, the fact that the drawings lack direct frontality by encircling the entire chamber forces the viewer to physically engage with the vessel by turning it to see the entire image.