frontogenesis


Also found in: Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to frontogenesis: frontolysis

fron·to·gen·e·sis

 (frŭn′tō-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. fron·to·gen·e·ses (-sēz′)
Formation or intensification of a meteorological front.

frontogenesis

(ˌfrʌntəʊˈdʒɛnɪsɪs)
n
(Physical Geography) meteorol the formation or development of a front through the meeting of air or water masses from different origins
frontogenetic adj
ˌfrontogeˈnetically adv

frontogenesis

the meeting of two masses of air, each with a different meteorological composition, thus forming a front, sometimes resulting in rain, snow, etc.
See also: Weather
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, use of the gradient in potential temperature (and its changes in direction and magnitude; i.e., frontogenesis) directly links to the ascent that is responsible for the clouds and precipitation along fronts.
Frontogenesis was originally defined by Petterssen (1936) as the Lagrangian rate of change of the magnitude of the horizontal gradient of temperature (or equivalently on a constant-pressure surface, potential temperature [theta]):
One advantage of [[theta].sub.v] is that it is a "dry variable" and can be used in dry analytical formulations of frontogenesis. However, in case of latent heating, it is not conserved.
Figures 19-20 capture 850 hPa streamlines, potential vorticity, and 700 hPa frontogenesis on 1800 UTC 11 February and 0600 UTC 12 February for each experiment.
His work on convective storms, cyclogenesis, frontogenesis, the Gulf Stream and jet stream, and numerous reviews to which he invariably brought new insights are well known.
Sanders, F., 1986: Frontogenesis and symmetric stability in a major New England snowstorm.
During the beginning stages of the event, a vortex develops on the cyclonic shear side of the mistrals in a strong confluent frontogenesis area over the sea.
2009) that often extend northeastward from the Sierra Nevada to DPG can be accompanied by abrupt transitions in sensible weather and serve as a locus for cyclogenesis or frontogenesis (e.g., Jeglum et al.
A number of dynamical processes have been proposed to explain this mesoscale-submesoscale transition, including spontaneous instability of deep mixed layers, ageostrophic instability, frontogenesis, and direct wind forcing at mesoscale fronts (Boccaletti et al.
The ascending branch of the secondary circulation associated with Petterssen (1936) frontogenesis (Fig.
aloft (trowal; Martin 1999), and low- to midlevel frontogenesis. The