frore


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frore

 (frôr)
adj. Archaic
Extremely cold; frosty.

[Middle English, past participle of fresen, to freeze, from Old English frēosan; see freeze.]

frore

(frɔː) or

frory

adj
archaic very cold or frosty
[C13 froren, past participle of Old English frēosan to freeze]

frore

(frɔr, froʊr)

adj. Archaic.
frozen.
[1200–50; Middle English froren, past participle of freeze]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.frore - very cold; "whatever the evenings be--frosty and frore or warm and wet"
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
cold - having a low or inadequate temperature or feeling a sensation of coldness or having been made cold by e.g. ice or refrigeration; "a cold climate"; "a cold room"; "dinner has gotten cold"; "cold fingers"; "if you are cold, turn up the heat"; "a cold beer"

frore

adjective
Archaic. Very cold:
Idiom: bitter cold.
References in classic literature ?
Beyond this flood a frozen Continent Lies dark and wilde, beat with perpetual storms Of Whirlwind and dire Hail, which on firm land Thaws not, but gathers heap, and ruin seems Of ancient pile; all else deep snow and ice, A gulf profound as that SERBONIAN Bog Betwixt DAMIATA and mount CASIUS old, Where Armies whole have sunk: the parching Air Burns frore, and cold performs th' effect of Fire.
Hence, most of the citizens prefer this kind of frore footwear in the summer season.
The model was calibrated to measured utility data from the Thornton store and submetered data frore of the same vintage in a similar climate zone.
A train doesn't depart from London, it "disembogues." Racing pundits exhale mist "into the frore Midlands night." Freddy wipes "freezing moisture from his pate." And returning to those adverbs, James stops to allow his dog to "officially micturate"--only this time the adverb works but the verb is too fine.