frost


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frost

 (frôst, frŏst)
n.
1.
a. A deposit of minute ice crystals formed when water vapor condenses at a temperature below freezing.
b. A period of weather when such deposits form.
2. A cold manner or period of disaffection: a frost in diplomatic relations.
v. frost·ed, frost·ing, frosts
v.tr.
1. To cover with frost.
2. To damage or kill by frost.
3. To cover (glass, for example) with a roughened or speckled decorative surface.
4. To cover or decorate with icing: frost a cake.
5. To bleach or lighten the color of (hair) with dye so that some but not all strands are changed in color.
6. Slang To anger or upset: What really frosted me about the incident was the fact that you lied.
v.intr.
To become covered with frost: The windshield frosted up overnight.

[Middle English, from Old English; see preus- in Indo-European roots.]

frost

(frɒst)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a white deposit of ice particles, esp one formed on objects out of doors at night. See also hoarfrost
2. (Physical Geography) an atmospheric temperature of below freezing point, characterized by the production of this deposit
3. (Physical Geography) degrees below freezing point: eight degrees of frost indicates a temperature of either –8°C or 24°F
4. informal something given a cold reception; failure
5. informal coolness of manner
6. the act of freezing
vb
7. to cover or be covered with frost
8. (Ceramics) (tr) to give a frostlike appearance to (glass, etc), as by means of a fine-grained surface
9. (Cookery) (tr) chiefly US and Canadian to decorate (cakes, etc) with icing or frosting
10. (Agriculture) (tr) to kill or damage (crops, etc) with frost
[Old English frost; related to Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old High German frost; see freeze]
ˈfrostˌlike adj

Frost

(frɒst)
n
1. (Biography) Sir David (Paradine). 1939–2013, British television presenter and executive, noted esp for political interviews
2. (Biography) Robert (Lee). 1874–1963, US poet, noted for his lyrical verse on country life in New England. His books include A Boy's Will (1913), North of Boston (1914), and New Hampshire (1923)

frost

(frɔst, frɒst)

n.
1. a degree or state of coldness sufficient to cause the freezing of water.
2. a covering of minute ice crystals, formed from the atmosphere at night upon the ground and exposed objects when they have cooled by radiation below the dew point.
3. the act or process of freezing.
4. coldness of manner or temperament.
5. Informal. something that meets with lack of enthusiasm, as a theatrical performance or party; failure; flop.
v.t.
6. to cover with frost.
7. to give a frostlike surface to (glass, metal, etc.).
8. to cover or decorate with frosting or icing; ice: to frost a cake.
9. to bleach selected strands of (a person's hair).
10. to kill or injure by frost.
11. to make angry.
v.i.
12. to become covered with frost or freeze (often fol. by up or over).
13. (of varnish, paint, etc.) to dry with a film resembling frost.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English frost, forst; c. Old High German, Old Norse frost; akin to freeze]

Frost

(frɔst, frɒst)

n.
Robert (Lee), 1874–1963, U.S. poet.

frost

(frôst)
A deposit of tiny ice crystals on a surface. Frost is formed when water vapor in the air condenses at a temperature below freezing.

Frost

 of dowagers—Lipton, 1970.

frost


Past participle: frosted
Gerund: frosting

Imperative
frost
frost
Present
I frost
you frost
he/she/it frosts
we frost
you frost
they frost
Preterite
I frosted
you frosted
he/she/it frosted
we frosted
you frosted
they frosted
Present Continuous
I am frosting
you are frosting
he/she/it is frosting
we are frosting
you are frosting
they are frosting
Present Perfect
I have frosted
you have frosted
he/she/it has frosted
we have frosted
you have frosted
they have frosted
Past Continuous
I was frosting
you were frosting
he/she/it was frosting
we were frosting
you were frosting
they were frosting
Past Perfect
I had frosted
you had frosted
he/she/it had frosted
we had frosted
you had frosted
they had frosted
Future
I will frost
you will frost
he/she/it will frost
we will frost
you will frost
they will frost
Future Perfect
I will have frosted
you will have frosted
he/she/it will have frosted
we will have frosted
you will have frosted
they will have frosted
Future Continuous
I will be frosting
you will be frosting
he/she/it will be frosting
we will be frosting
you will be frosting
they will be frosting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been frosting
you have been frosting
he/she/it has been frosting
we have been frosting
you have been frosting
they have been frosting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been frosting
you will have been frosting
he/she/it will have been frosting
we will have been frosting
you will have been frosting
they will have been frosting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been frosting
you had been frosting
he/she/it had been frosting
we had been frosting
you had been frosting
they had been frosting
Conditional
I would frost
you would frost
he/she/it would frost
we would frost
you would frost
they would frost
Past Conditional
I would have frosted
you would have frosted
he/she/it would have frosted
we would have frosted
you would have frosted
they would have frosted

frost

To cover a cake with a thin layer of icing sugar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frost - ice crystals forming a white deposit (especially on objects outside)frost - ice crystals forming a white deposit (especially on objects outside)
ice, water ice - water frozen in the solid state; "Americans like ice in their drinks"
2.frost - weather cold enough to cause freezing
cold weather - a period of unusually cold weather
3.frost - the formation of frost or ice on a surfacefrost - the formation of frost or ice on a surface
freeze, freezing - the withdrawal of heat to change something from a liquid to a solid
4.frost - United States poet famous for his lyrical poems on country life in New England (1874-1963)Frost - United States poet famous for his lyrical poems on country life in New England (1874-1963)
Verb1.frost - decorate with frosting; "frost a cake"
cookery, cooking, preparation - the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
cover - provide with a covering or cause to be covered; "cover her face with a handkerchief"; "cover the child with a blanket"; "cover the grave with flowers"
2.frost - provide with a rough or speckled surface or appearance; "frost the glass"; "she frosts her hair"
cover - provide with a covering or cause to be covered; "cover her face with a handkerchief"; "cover the child with a blanket"; "cover the grave with flowers"
3.frost - cover with frost; "ice crystals frosted the glass"
cover - provide with a covering or cause to be covered; "cover her face with a handkerchief"; "cover the child with a blanket"; "cover the grave with flowers"
4.frost - damage by frost; "The icy precipitation frosted the flowers and they turned brown"
damage - inflict damage upon; "The snow damaged the roof"; "She damaged the car when she hit the tree"

frost

noun hoarfrost, freeze, freeze-up, Jack Frost, rime There is a frost in the ground.
Translations
جَليدصَقيعصَقِيعيَتَغَطّى بالجليديُغَطّي الحَلوى بالسُّكَّر
jinovatkamráznamrznoutpokrýt jinovatkouzalít ledovou polevou
frostfrostvejrfryse tilglasere
huurrehuurtuakuurapakkanenhalla
mrazslanainje
cukoröntettel bevondérfagyzúzmarazúzmarával von be
frosthéla, hríma
서리
apšerkšnijęsapšerkšnytiaptepti glajumiliukrasnušalęs
apsarmotnokostparklat ar glazurusalnasals
inovaťzaliať polevou
slanazmrzal
frost
น้ำค้างแข็ง
donkırağıkırağı tutmakşekerlemek
sương giá

frost

[frɒst]
A. N (= substance) → escarcha f; (= weather) → helada f
four degrees of frost (Brit) → cuatro grados bajo cero
B. VT
1. the grass was frosted overel césped apareció cubierto de escarcha
2. (esp US) (Culin) → escarchar
C. VI to frost over or upcubrirse de escarcha, escarcharse

frost

[ˈfrɒst]
n
(on ground)gel m, gelée f
there will be a frost → il va geler
There will be a frost tonight → Il va geler cette nuit.
degrees of frost (British)degrés au-dessous de zéro
(also hoarfrost) → givre m
vt [+ cake] → glacer

frost

n
Frost m; (on leaves etc) → Raureif m; late frostsspäte Frostperioden pl; ten degrees of frostzehn Grad Kälte
(fig, = cold manner) → Kühle f, → Kälte f, → Frostigkeit f
(dated sl, = failure) → Pleite f (inf), → Reinfall m
vt
glassmattieren
(esp US) cakemit Zuckerguss überziehen, glasieren
(= quick-freeze)einfrieren, tiefkühlen

frost

:
frostbite
nFrostbeulen pl; (more serious) → Erfrierungen pl; to suffer (from) frostFrostbeulen/Erfrierungen haben
frostbitten
adj fingers, toes, personerfroren; crops, plantsdurch Frost geschädigt; people with frost fingersLeute mit Frostbeulen/Erfrierungen an den Fingern; he was badly froster hatte sehr starke Erfrierungen
frostbound
adj groundhart gefroren

frost

[frɒst]
1. ngelo (also hoar frost) → brina; (on window) → ghiaccio
an overnight frost → gelata notturna
4 degrees of frost → 4 gradi sotto zero
2. vt (esp Am) (ice, cakes) → glassare

frost

(frost) noun
1. frozen dew, vapour etc. The ground was covered with frost this morning.
2. the coldness of weather needed to form ice. There'll be (a) frost tomorrow.
verb
(often with over or up).
1. to become covered with frost. The windscreen of my car frosted up last night.
2. (American) to cover a cake with frosting.
frosting noun
(American) icing.
ˈfrosty adjective
1. covered with frost. the frosty countryside.
2. of behaviour, very unfriendly. a frosty manner.
ˈfrostily adverb
frostbite noun
injury caused to the body by very great cold. He was suffering from frostbite in his feet.
ˈfrostbitten adjective

frost

صَقِيع mráz frost Frost παγωνιά helada huurre givre mraz brina 서리 vorst frost mróz geada мороз frost น้ำค้างแข็ง don sương giá

frost

n. escarcha, helada.
References in classic literature ?
Further on, from the bright red windows of the Sword-Fish Inn, there came such fervent rays, that it seemed to have melted the packed snow and ice from before the house, for everywhere else the congealed frost lay ten inches thick in a hard, asphaltic pavement, --rather weary for me, when I struck my foot against the flinty projections, because from hard, remorseless service the soles of my boots were in a most miserable plight.
The Snow covered up the grass with her great white cloak, and the Frost painted all the trees silver.
Its wild water defied the frost, and it was in the eddies only and in the quiet places that the ice held at all.
I dare not,' said the other, 'for if I were to put my hat on straight, there would come such a frost that the very birds in the sky would freeze and fall dead on the earth.
Not many days later, winter set in again with renewed frost and cold.
The rest of his face was protected by a thick beard, golden-brown under its coating of frost.
In the fall one walks in the orchards and the ground is hard with frost under- foot.
When the streets were slippery with frost or snow that was the worst of all for us horses.
It is confounded hard to lose one of the best scenting days, in all appearance, which hath been this season, and especially after so long a frost.
For frost and winter I now longed: "Oh, that frost and winter would again make me crack and crunch
A few instants later the platform was quivering, and with puffs of steam hanging low in the air from the frost, the engine rolled up, with the lever of the middle wheel rhythmically moving up and down, and the stooping figure of the engine-driver covered with frost.
I try in vain to be persuaded that the pole is the seat of frost and desolation; it ever presents itself to my imagination as the region of beauty and delight.