frost heave


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frost heave

n.
A section of ground or pavement that has been pushed up by the freezing of water in the soil. Also called regionally frost boil.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

frost heave

n
(Physical Geography) the upthrust and cracking of a ground surface through the freezing and expansion of water underneath. Also called: frost heaving
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

frost′ heave`


n.
an uplift in soil caused by the freezing of internal moisture.
[1945–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frost heave - upthrust of ground or pavement caused by the freezing of moist soil
geological phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the structure or composition of the earth
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References in periodicals archive ?
Shallow-rooted plants Varieties with shallow root systems, like Heuchera and strawberries, are prone to frost heave - where repeated freezing and thawing of groundwater pushes their roots out of the ground.
shallow -rooted plants VARIETIES with shallow root systems, like Heuchera and strawberries, are prone to frost heave - where repeated freezing and thawing of groundwater pushes their roots out of the ground.
PVC plastic construction affords the restraints superior strength and memory, they add, while a patented lip design means the edging will stay in place through the ground's frost heave movement and help keep sand where it is meant to be.
Traditionally, coarse-grained soils are usually identified as frost heave insensitive materials because of the large grain size, small grain surface energy, weak hydrophilic performance, little film water, large porosity, unapparent capillarity, and weak water migration, and water is easy to freeze into ice in situ [1-4].
Chan, "A unified model for frost heave pressure in the rock with a penny-shaped fracture during freezing," Cold Regions Science and Technology, vol.
When we bury the fat end of a post down, the frost heave pressure will push the post further into the ground.
And the moisture migration may affect the change of soil pores, such as the size of pores and the pore water press, which may cause frost heave and the damage to the infrastructure [1, 2], while for the salinized soil in cold region the soluble salt which is dissolved in the water would be transported during the water migration in the process of freezing, which can cause the secondary salinization [3, 4].
Frost heave, we thought, the result of a hard winter and a spring thaw.
Frost heave and thaw collapse of frozen soil sub-grade in cold regions have long been plaguing the stability and the normal operation of line projects.
When that water freezes, it expands, causing what's known as a frost heave. Frost heaves are responsible for large cracks, as well as potholes in your driveway, making just getting home a bumpy adventure.
These aggregates are becoming more common in road and bridge construction because they are easy to place, require simple testing for quality assurance, and have the advantages of very low fine particle content, lighter unit weight, free-draining characteristics, and low potential for frost heave.
Some of these include frost heave, loads on pipeline components due to snow and ice accumulation, thermal stresses due to extreme cold temperatures, and confined expansion of freezing water within components.