frostwork


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frost·work

 (frôst′wûrk′, frŏst′-)
n.
1. The intricate patterns produced by frost, as on a windowpane.
2. Artificially made ornamental patterns similar to those produced by frost, applied to the surface of metal or glass.

frostwork

(ˈfrɒstˌwɜːk)
n
1. the patterns made by frost on glass, metal, etc
2. (Art Terms) similar artificial ornamentation

frost•work

(ˈfrɔstˌwɜrk, ˈfrɒst-)

n.
1. the delicate tracery formed by frost, esp. on glass.
2. similar ornamentation, as on metal.
[1640–50]
References in classic literature ?
This shortly brought them to a be- witching spring, whose basin was incrusted with a frostwork of glittering crystals; it was in the midst of a cavern whose walls were supported by many fan- tastic pillars which had been formed by the joining of great stalactites and stalagmites together, the result of the ceaseless water-drip of centuries.
He is one of those, perchance the most hopeless of all sinners, who practise such an exemplary system of outward duties, that even a deadly crime may be hidden from their own sight and remembrance, under this unreal frostwork. Yet he now finds his place.
When they are real, they are not glass threads or frostwork, but the solidest thing we know.
For example, among the 123 geo photos comprising "earthforms", are the toothed Ordovician strata of Llangranog, Wales; an ice canyon in the fog at Yolyn Am, Mongolia; the cotton-wool-like calcium carbonate "frostwork" in a cave at Is Zuddas, Sardinia; varieties of honeycomb-like tafoni juxtaposed with a phantom humanoid puddle on Gabriola Island, British Columbia; the ill-fitting jigsaw puzzle of the littoral reef in Doolin, Ireland; and mud mosaics that project back virtually in time in Bisti Wilderness, NM.
The impetus of Advent is revealed in God's creation: in the slanted light of fading afternoon; in the hours after midnight: the springtime constellations tangled low in branches; and in the granule frostwork of the dawn.
In fact, he contributed several essays to the paper in 1831 and early 1832 under the pen name "Atticus." Titles such as "Land Tortoises and Mud Turtles" (29 March 1831), "Natural Frostwork" (15 April 1831), "Old Thunder--An Indian Tradition" (5 July 1831), "The First Fall of Snow" (6 December 1831), and "Duty of Parish and Town Officers" (25 January 1832) provide evidence of his range of interests and his role as local authority.
Sandford~ on "Greek Authoresses" for The Edinburgh Review 55 (1832): 198, notes that Sappho gives "strictly a physical picture" of love in the second ode--"no play of the fancy--no fairy frostwork."
Should the colleges go on preparing teachers separately by category when virtually every serious review of the situation says the distinctions are mere frostwork? I agree, of course, that the children involved usually have real problems; it is the way we partition the children, teachers, and programs to deal with the problems that is flawed and grossly inefficient.
If you have such a window in your home, you may have noticed frostworks only form when the thermometer dips close to zero.