froufrou


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frou·frou

also frou-frou  (fro͞o′fro͞o)
n.
1. Fussy or showy dress or ornamentation.
2. A rustling sound, as of silk.
adj.
Fussy or showy in dress or ornamentation: "The cutesy, froufrou baby clothes of the past were tacky and foolish-looking" (Susan Gregory Thomas).

[French, of imitative origin.]

froufrou

(ˈfruːˌfruː)
n
1. a swishing sound, as made by a long silk dress
2. (Clothing & Fashion) elaborate dress or ornamentation, esp worn by women
[C19: from French, of imitative origin]

frou•frou

(ˈfruˌfru)

n., pl. -frous.
1. frilly decoration.
2. a rustling, as of a woman's dress.
[1865–70; < French]
References in periodicals archive ?
The mark of a true fashion icon, she puts together items which shouldn't look good together, but do - such as last season's froufrou pink tulle Molly Goddard dress, worn with punky Balenciaga boots.
It probably doesn't help that ballet vocabulary is French (too froufrou) or that it's considered a Russian art form (too subversive--maybe even Communist!).
Designer Mark Bumgarner veered away from the traditional froufrou and played up with texture and minimal sequins.
The annual show of "Fiber, Fabric and Froufrou" will be underway through May
It is not in this verbal froufrou but rather in the drama of Isabel's revenge that Banville's story shows its true strength." JEAN ZIMMERMAN
FrouFrou (Rare) 6 this character scampers along and can be won in Gatcha prize machine or bought for $1.99
That's because, in a smart move, Cadillac offers the Vsport sedan in a version that trades some luxury froufrou for lavish mechanicals and bracing performance.
"I thought, I don't want froufrou pineapples and swags, but if I could get that level of detail, I could actually make some really intricate textures," says Mackereth, who took inspiration from the 20th-century modernist architects Richard Neutra and John Lautner, famous for their airy California homes and organic furniture pieces.
Decaf for John [Tarantino] and froufrou coffees for the boys [Porter McHenry, 27; Justen Tarantino, 27].
whose spelling is tautological--are of two kinds: terms such as froufrou and Pago Pago, which were fashioned from two or more identical subunits, and terms such as hotshots and valval, which were not.
When co-owners Scott Ostrander and Ryan David Stanley opened Oregon's Constant Gardener in February, their aim was to create an organic garden center focused on food production "without all the froufrou gift stuff."