fructose


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fruc·tose

 (frŭk′tōs′, fro͝ok′-)
n.
A very sweet monosaccharide sugar, C6H12O6, occurring in many fruits and in honey, and used as a preservative for foodstuffs and as an intravenous nutrient. Also called fruit sugar, levulose.

[Latin frūctus, fruit; see fruit + -ose.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fructose

(ˈfrʌktəʊs; -təʊz; ˈfrʊk-)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a white crystalline water-soluble sugar occurring in honey and many fruits. Formula: C6H12O6. Also called: laevulose or fruit sugar
[C19: from Latin frūctus fruit + -ose2]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fruc•tose

(ˈfrʌk toʊs, ˈfrʊk-, ˈfruk-)

n.
a crystalline, water-soluble, levorotatory ketose sugar, C6H12O6, sweeter than sucrose, occurring in invert sugar, honey, and many fruits: chiefly used in foodstuffs.
[1860–65; < Latin frūct(us) fruit]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fruc·tose

(frŭk′tōs′)
A simple sugar found in honey, many fruits, and some vegetables. Fructose is similar to glucose, is sweeter than table sugar, and is an important source of energy for cellular processes.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fructose

(or levulose) A source of energy found in sweet fruits. See monosaccharides.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fructose - a simple sugar found in honey and in many ripe fruits
ketohexose - a monosaccharide having six carbon atoms and a ketone group
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
fruktóza
fruktose
フルクトース果糖
과당
fruktozė
fruktosefruktsukker
frutose
fruktosfruktsocker

fructose

[ˈfrʊktəʊz] nfructose m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fructose

[ˈfrʌktəʊs] nfruttosio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fruc·tose

n. fructosa, azúcar de frutas; lebulosa;
___ intoleranceintolerancia a la ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fructose

n fructosa
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Report provides the various consumer behaviours that affect market growth and the trends in the market such as buying patterns and various channel preferences of consumers in the fructose market.
Summary: Report provides the various consumer behaviours that affect market growth and the trends in the market such as buying patterns and various channel preferences of consumers in the fructose market.
Recent studies have identified the excessive consumption of alcohol and sugars, especially fructose in added sugars, as the real causes of gout.
High-fructose corn syrup consists of glucose and fructose at a 45:55 ratio.
You may recognize fructose as the kind of sugar we find in fruit.
Fructose is the natural sugar found in fruit and in its natural form it's exempt from harmful effects.
Summary: Washington DC [USA], Nov 22 (ANI): According to a recent study, fruits and other foods containing fructose seem to have no harmful effect on blood glucose levels, while sweetened drinks and eatables that add excess energy to diets may have negative effects.
Background: A high consumption of fructose leads to hepatic steatosis.
LOS ANGELES -- Sugar consumption has been implicated as a risk factor for the development of diabetes since at least the 1920s, but high salt intake may also increase the risk for obesity and prediabetes by stimulating fructose production in the liver.
Fructose is a monosaccharide that is present in significant amounts in fruits, honey, table sugar (sucrose has a 50% fructose content), and soft drinks sweetened with high fructose corn syrup (55% fructose content) [1].
There are currently various sugars that are added to foods as supplements to improve the commercial properties of some products; among them are sucrose, fructose, and honey [2].
Studies suggest that diets high in simple sugars, specifically fructose, increase the rate at which sugar is converted to fat and liver fat.