frug


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frug

(fruːɡ)
n
a type of dance popular in the 1960s
vb (intr)
to dance in such a style
References in periodicals archive ?
Kerri wants an assistance dog for her mobility issues, and despite the trainer's reservations on her choice of breed, she's determined to train her Frug (French Bulldog-Pug cross to the uninitiated).
Scholars such as Gerald Frug have noted that economic development in American cities manifests in "public-private mechanisms, such as public-private partnerships, tax increment financing, and a reliance on private institutions to implement public priorities." (21) Legislation plays an essential role in giving effect to these mechanisms.
Relatedly, since 1980 Jerry Frug has articulated a rationale for
See, e.g., Jerry Frug, Decentering Decentralization, 60 U.
Laurie Yates, 48, of Cobden, was charged with possession of methamphetamines and possession of frug paraphernalia on Jan.
A intervencao do professor de EF e inestimavel na construcao da inclusao (Brasil, 1997), da execucao motora (Orta e Algarra, 2010), do desenvolvimento das capacidades (Cidade e Freitas, 2002) e da formacao da consciencia corporal (Frug, 2001), alem de oportunizar a pratica esportiva (Borgmann e Almeida, 2015) dos alunos com deficiencia.
"But Fosse's composition will always get you out of a jam." A particular favorite, he says, is "Rich Man's Frug," with its interweaving clusters crossing and circling one another.
Dance Dance Dance City Library Heard of The Frug, The Ooble or The Popcorn?
In the 1990s, Professor Frug postulated that "[o]nly a central government seems capable of bringing together the disparate groups that have grown so remote from each other." (166) In his current article on the intractability of affordable housing, Professor Eagle agrees that local governmental solutions are unrealistic.
As Gerald Frug has noted, "[o]n a local level, democracy can be a lived experience--it enables engagement in public issues that goes far beyond voting," (215) spilling over into identity in a way less possible at a state or federal level.
(22) See Baxi 2010, 2014; Frug 2014; Menon, 1998; MacKinnon, 2001 for further discussion.
"For more than a century, it's been understood that city power derives from state law," says Harvard Law School professor Gerald Frug, co-author of City Bound: How States Stifle Urban Innovation.