fruiterer


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fruiterer

(ˈfruːtərə)
n
(Commerce) chiefly Brit a fruit dealer or seller
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fruit•er•er

(ˈfru tər ər)

n. Chiefly Brit.
a dealer in fruit.
[1375–1425; late Middle English fruterer, extended form of fruter < Anglo-French; see fruit, -er2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fruiterer - a person who sells fruit
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
marketer, seller, trafficker, vender, vendor - someone who promotes or exchanges goods or services for money
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

fruiterer

[ˈfruːtərəʳ] N (Brit) → frutero/a m/f
fruiterer's (shop)frutería f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fruiterer

[ˈfruːtər] n
(= person) → fruitier m, marchand(e) m/f de fruits
(= shop) fruiterer's → fruiterie ffruit fly ndrosophile f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fruiterer

n (esp Brit) → Obsthändler(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fruiterer

[ˈfruːtərəʳ] n (esp Brit) → fruttivendolo/a
at the fruiterer's (shop) → dal fruttivendolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Passing a fruiterer's, he remembered that Mildred was fond of grapes.
"It was the fruiterer," replied my friend, "who brought you to the conclusion that the mender of soles was not of sufficient height for Xerxes et id genus omne."
"The fruiterer! - you astonish me - I know no fruiterer whomsoever."
I now remembered that, in fact, a fruiterer, carrying upon his head a large basket of apples, had nearly thrown me down, by accident, as we passed from the Rue C into the thoroughfare where we stood; but what this had to do with Chantilly I could not possibly understand.
"I will explain," he said, "and that you may comprehend all clearly, we will first retrace the course of your meditations, from the moment in which I spoke to you until that of the rencontre with the fruiterer in question.
As we crossed into this street, a fruiterer, with a large basket upon his head, brushing quickly past us, thrust you upon a pile of paving stones collected at a spot where the causeway is undergoing repair.
The shop was a popular greengrocer and fruiterer's, an array of goods set out in the open air and plainly ticketed with their names and prices.
Only a fruiterer's stall at the corner made a violent blaze of light and colour.
The poulterers' shops were still half open, and the fruiterers' were radiant in their glory.
The lancecorporal was the son-in-law of Mr Thomas Young, fruiterer, 60 Baker Street, Stirling.
In 1911 George's mother was working as a fruiterer and florist.