frumpish


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frump·ish

 (frŭm′pĭsh)
adj.
1. Dull or plain.
2. Prim and sedate.

frump′ish·ly adv.
frump′ish·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.frumpish - primly out of date; "nothing so frumpish as last year's gambling game"
unfashionable, unstylish - not in accord with or not following current fashion; "unfashionable clothes"; "melodrama of a now unfashionable kind"

frumpish

adjective
Quite outmoded or unfashionable:
Informal: tacky.
Translations

frumpish

[ˈfrʌmpɪʃ] ADJdesaliñado

frumpish

[ˈfrʌmpɪʃ] frumpy [ˈfrʌmpɪ] adjscialbo/a e fuori moda
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References in periodicals archive ?
NEIL has just noticed that in the strawberry patch, which was looking a bit frumpish, most of the dead leaves are falling away of their own accord.
PATCH WORK: Neil has just noticed that in the strawberry patch, which was looking a bit frumpish, most of the dead leaves are falling away of their own accord.
A saving grace is Mendes, who's been handed a rare role that doesn't depend on her looks, and delivers a fitfully agitated and occasionally frumpish turn.
In an Anglo Saxon world, where only women flaunted their sexuality, effeminancy was the best course open to a male sex symbol--even the frumpish Bill Haley sported a kiss curl (Booth 155).
Young, long-suffering, frumpish Annie is torn between an illicit weekend with Nor-manboyfriend Tom's inactivity and mum's pills.
You'll be swamped by billowing material and will only look fat and frumpish."
And Kracht's text bounces off vigorously from the two Korea visit texts of his compatriot, the 'frumpish' writer and ex-Nazi prisoner, Luise Rinser.
Marie Besnard, the heroine - or anti-heroine; we never found out for sure - was middle-aged, plumpish and decidedly frumpish.
The Clintons, whose slogan is "change", have looked sour, ungenerous and slightly frumpish when faced by a version of change for which they didn't bargain.
Then she had to do her own hair (hence the frumpish cut) and supply her own kit (an oversized jacket and workman's boots).
The notion is manifest most clearly, of course, in the story of the frumpish, garrulous, endearing British matron Tony Kushner calls the Homebody in his new play Homebody/Kabul--a woman who has spent half a life staying in the house and then decides, fatefully, to cross the threshold into a larger world of chaos and unreason.