full marks


Also found in: Idioms.

full marks

pl.n. Chiefly British
Full or due credit or praise.

full′ marks′


n.pl.
Brit.
full credit; due praise.
[1915–20]
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Perkins had written the marks, a surprise awaited him; for the two boys at the top of the form seemed to have done very ill, while others who had never distinguished themselves before were given full marks.
Miss Lavish laid her hand pleasantly on Lucy's arm, as if to suggest that she, at all events, would get full marks.
But she's patienter than others would be, and is clever too, and always willing, up to the full mark of her strength and over.
FOOTBALL supporters sometimes receive a bad name - usually because of a mindless minority - so full marks to everyone around the country for observing the minute's silence over the last few days in memory of all those who have sacrificed their lives in various wars to defend this country.
Full marks English FAs for ridiculous FIFA to any As Prime Minister, Theresa May, said: FIFA should put their own house in order - they are a disgrace.
We want to finish the programme with full marks," the minister said adding that also Wieser "believes that it would be better to complete not just the review but also the programme with another full marks".
More than half of those in attendance gained full marks in WJEC A-level subjects in the 2014 summer exam series.
The 1D heart-throb helped Kate Garraway's daughter Darcey with her English homework after chatting to the ITV presenter on Good Morning Britain - and got full marks.
Usamah scored full marks in 8 units of the GCE examinations.
We don't know about a "10 from Len" but this look gets full marks from us.
This group of outstanding scholarship recipients includes one student who received full marks on her SAT -- Critical Reading examination, as well as another student who received full marks on his SAT -- Math examination.
So full marks to Lisa Snowdon on her outfit choice to present the Capital FM Jingle Bell Ball.