full rhyme


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Related to full rhyme: Exact Rhyme

full rhyme

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And often since, in Danger, I count the force 'twould be To have a God so strong as that To hold my life for me If we read this aloud, the ascending meter and full rhyme that closes the stanza has an almost heroic sound to it and certainly it could be put to music.
The rhyme occurs elsewhere too (Socrates', possibly), and there are also partial rhymes, normally adjacent to a full rhyme (bomb, perform, flee); but the colon-end rhyme is clearly more important.
This poem of pregnancy uses full rhyme throughout, reminding us that the mother "rhymes" with the child inside her.
I use syllabics instead of iambs, prefer slant- to the gong of full rhyme, write briefly while others go for pages.
158 (end-word): full rhyme for 158-9 in Beaumont, Shadwell.
The form exhibits a complex pattern of internal and terminal rhyme, alliteration, and especially alternation of consonance with full rhyme at the ends of lines.
The first citation exhibits something common in Paradise Lost, a departure from full rhyme only due to the presence of a terminal plural or past tense marker.
The initial full rhyme touches off a flurry of slant vowel-rhymes punctuated by another final full rhyme that carries great phenomenal weight in Meister's thinking: the "not any" (kein) rhymes fully with the "one" (ein).
Cloete's poetry is dominated by end rhyme-not half-rhyme or assonance, but relentless full rhyme. One feels at times in fact that a poem is embroidered upon from the spark contained in a rhyme.
Certain vowels and consonants are sounded again and again without being brought into full rhyme: whirring, turn, leathery, work, winter, weather, there, grandfather, horse, whirr, thresher, showers, morning; and stillness, fistful, whistles; whirr, stillness, whistles; lamp-hung, lank, leathery; leathery, all-weather; coasting, goatee; and other repeated phonemes.
The poets mostly wrote metrical verses with full rhymes. The major literary influences were French, German, English and Russian.
Four irregular beats to a line, sometimes three in a row as in "mauve-blue sky," full rhymes and half-rhymes in tetrameters, most lines contain consonantal resonances within them, and a final couplet unexpectedly not echoing its sounds, although "dream" echoes "time," and "alone" echoes "station," "intention," and "companion." Of course, these subtleties perform their work mostly in the reader's subconscious mind, but isn't it impressive to find this much conscious art on the part of a poet?