full time


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full time

n
(General Sporting Terms) the end of a football or other match. Compare half-time
Translations

full time

1. n (Sport) → fine f partita
References in classic literature ?
The child was indeed to all appearances perfect; but the midwife discovered it was born a month before its full time.
She is nothing to me, compared with you;" and she was in full time to hear her father say, "My dear madam, this must not be.
It is full time,'' said De Bracy, ``that the outrecuidance*
As the sheriff allowed his cousin full time to reflect on what he had heard, the probability of some pecuniary adventure being the connecting link in the chain that brought Oliver Edwards into the cabin of Leather-Stocking appeared to him each moment to be stronger.
There was no second letter to explain away the first from Miss Crawford; there was no intelligence from Mansfield, though it was now full time for her to hear again from her aunt.
Sapsea's monument having had full time to settle and dry, let me take your opinion, as a man of taste, on the inscription I have (as I before remarked, not without some little fever of the brow) drawn out for it.
Well, never you mind that, my dear,' said the old lady; 'that's got nothing to do with your broth; and it's full time you had it; for the doctor says Mr.
We left town sooner than was intended, in consequence of my uncle's indisposition; - I wonder what would have been the result if we had stayed the full time.
As to the officer, now grown mute again, he had full time for meditation.
It is full time that boy went to herding," said the head-man, while Buldeo puffed and snorted at Mowgli's impertinence.
It was full time to show myself, quietly and unconcernedly, among the wretches who were at that very moment, perhaps, thinking of us and talking of us downstairs.
So Law appears imperfet, and but giv'n With purpose to resign them in full time Up to a better Cov'nant, disciplin'd From shadowie Types to Truth, from Flesh to Spirit, From imposition of strict Laws, to free Acceptance of large Grace, from servil fear To filial, works of Law to works of Faith.