functionalism

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func·tion·al·ism

 (fŭngk′shə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The doctrine that the function of an object should determine its design and materials.
2. A doctrine stressing purpose, practicality, and utility.
3. Philosophy The doctrine in the philosophy of mind according to which mental states are defined by their causes and effects.

func′tion·al·ist′ adj. & n.

functionalism

(ˈfʌŋkʃənəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Architecture) the theory of design that the form of a thing should be determined by its use
2. any doctrine that stresses utility or purpose
3. (Psychology) psychol a system of thought based on the premise that all mental processes derive from their usefulness to the organism in adapting to the environment
ˈfunctionalist n, adj

func•tion•al•ism

(ˈfʌŋk ʃə nlˌɪz əm)

n.
1. (often cap.)
a. a design movement evolved esp. in the early 20th century, advocating that form and design be determined by practical issues, as materials, construction, and purpose, with aesthetic effect subordinated to functionality.
b. the doctrines and practices associated with this movement.
2. a school of psychology that emphasizes the adaptiveness of mental and behavioral processes.
3. Sociol. a theoretical orientation that views society as a system of interdependent parts whose functions contribute to the stability and survival of the system.
[1910–15]
func′tion•al•ist, n., adj.
func`tion•al•is′tic, adj.

functionalism

a philosophy of architectural design rather than a separate style, expressed in Louis Sullivan’s “form follows function” and Le Corbu-sier’s concept of a house as a machine for living in, under the premise that buildings ought to express construction, materials, and accommodation of purpose, usually with the assumption that the result would be aesthetically significant. Also called structuralism. — functionalist, n., adj.
See also: Architecture

functionalism

A school of sociological and anthropological thought which considers social institutions such as religion within the context of the social system as a whole.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.functionalism - a psychology based on the assumption that all mental process are useful to an organism in adapting to the environment
scientific theory - a theory that explains scientific observations; "scientific theories must be falsifiable"
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
2.functionalism - any doctrine that stresses utility or purpose
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations
funkisfunktionalismi
fonctionnalisme

functionalism

[ˈfʌŋkʃnəlɪzəm] Nfuncionalismo m

functionalism

[ˈfʌŋkʃənəlɪzəm] n [design] → fonctionnalisme m

functionalism

References in periodicals archive ?
A comparison of the EU and Russian led groupings from the perspective of dualistic operational model clearly shows that both the functionalists as well as the imperialist models seem to work simultaneously in both cases.
Works by functionalists such as Reiss (1980), Reiss and Vermeer (1984), and Nord (1997), particularly their notions of text types and of the skopos of translation are useful for understanding and describing whereby translation and localization project managers identify project objectives and determine project scope.
Kripke's omission of anything much in the way of characterizing functionalism and distinguishing varieties may be disappointing, but it is not surprising, given his complaint that up to the time at which he was speaking professed functionalists, apart from David Lewis, had been unclear about many important aspects of their various versions of the doctrine.
(60) This sort of approach tends to turn away functionalists seeking the objectivity of acontextual and ahistorical processes that support hard science and a stable worldview.
The problems with this kind of approach have been well documented in the past few decades (Elster 1989; Giddens 2007) and the result has been the (to my mind rather unfortunate) virtual exclusion of many of the classical structural functionalists from much of contemporary debate in social science.
Although not all functionalists employ the terminology of computers, hardware, and software, an important element of the computer model characterizes all versions of the basic functionalist idea, namely the conception of mental properties as abstract high-order properties.
According to Schaefer (2005:13) functionalists liken society to a living "organism in which each part of the organism contributes to its survival.
(12) Functionalists believe the professions serve the common good; (13) revisionists insist that they subvert it.
So that new functionalists could be pushed onto the mobile devices without requiring end users to update their app.
In the last few years, an intense debate has taken place in International Human Resource Management (IHRM) theory and practice between the so-called functionalists and the opposing critical approach.
Mitrany, Haas, and other functionalists may have been ahead of their time, or may have relied too heavily on underspecified causal mechanisms, or both.

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