fungicide


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fun·gi·cide

 (fŭn′jĭ-sīd′, fŭng′gĭ-)
n.
A substance that destroys or inhibits the growth of fungi.

fun′gi·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

fungicide

(ˈfʌndʒɪˌsaɪd)
n
(Chemistry) a substance or agent that destroys or is capable of destroying fungi
ˌfungiˈcidal adj

fun•gi•cide

(ˈfʌn dʒəˌsaɪd, ˈfʌŋ gə-)

n.
a substance used for destroying fungi.
[1885–90]
fun`gi•cid′al, adj.
fun`gi•cid′al•ly, adv.

fun·gi·cide

(fŭn′jĭ-sīd′, fŭng′gĭ-sīd′)
A chemical used to kill fungal diseases. Compare herbicide, insecticide, pesticide.

fungicide

a substance that kills fungi or retards the growth of spores.
See also: Killing, Plants
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fungicide - any agent that destroys or prevents the growth of fungi
Bordeaux mixture - antifungal agent consisting of a solution of copper sulphate and quicklime
Fulvicin, griseofulvin - a kind of penicillin (a fungicidal antibiotic with the trade name Fulvicin) produced by molds of the genus Penicillium
Clioquinol, iodochlorhydroxyquin - drug used to treat certain fungal infection (as athlete's foot)
itraconazole, Sporanox - an oral antifungal drug (trade name Sporanox) taken for cases of fungal nail disease
miconazole, Monistat - an antifungal agent usually administered in the form of a nitrate (trade name Monistat)
Mycostatin, Nystan, nystatin - an antifungal and antibiotic (trade names Mycostatin and Nystan) discovered in New York State; derived from soil fungi actinomycetes
Lamisil, terbinafine - an oral antifungal drug (trade name Lamisil) used to treat cases of fungal nail disease
thiabendazole - an antifungal agent and anthelmintic
crystal violet, gentian violet - a green crystal (violet in water) used as a dye or stain or bactericide or fungicide or anthelmintic or burn treatment
agent - a substance that exerts some force or effect
Translations
مُبيد الفِطْرِيّات
fungicid
fungicid
gombaölõ
sveppaeyîir
fungicíd
mantar öldürücü

fungicide

[ˈfʌŋgɪsaɪd] Nfungicida m

fungicide

[ˈfʌŋgɪsaɪd] nfongicide m

fungicide

nFungizid nt, → pilztötendes Mittel

fungicide

[ˈfʌndʒɪˌsaɪd] nfungicida m; (for plants) → anticrittogamico

fungus

(ˈfaŋgəs) plurals ˈfungi (-gai) ˈfunguses noun
any of several kinds of soft spongy plants without any leaves or green part. A mushroom is one type of fungus; That tree has a fungus growing on it.
ˈfungicide (-dʒisaid) noun
a substance used to kill fungus.

fun·gi·cide

n. fungicida, exterminador de hongos.

fungicide

n fungicida m
References in periodicals archive ?
The active ingredient in Actinovate, another organic fungicide, is a different soil-occurring bacterium, Streptomyces lydicus.
Compare yield response of fungicide application timing across multiple fungicide classes and calculate the probability of positive ROI.
As the reason of fungicide resistance [22], in order to discover new fungicides which possess high efficacy, low toxicity and safety to non-target organisms, a series of heterocyclic/homocyclic benzamide derivatives based on fluopicolide have been designed according to the rule of connecting bioactive substructures together (Fig.
Growers have been told to hold their nerve and avoid applying extra doses of fungicide to control septoria.
He says as the fungus attacks wheat fields in patches, farmers may use the fungicide only at the affected areas to save costs.
However, in recent years, that trend has begun to change, and more growers seriously consider using a fungicide every season to help increase yield and plant health.
ALB control relies on up to three fungicide applications, which must be applied between June and the first week of August (before the appearance of disease leaf lesions) to be effective (Adaskaveg et al.
M2 EQUITYBITES-April 26, 2018-ADAMA to launch distinctive fungicide CRONNOS in Brazil against Soybean rust
The findings of the present study suggest that the adoption of resistant variety Shasho with fungicide Apron Star seed-treatment may result in reduced fusarium wilt disease progress with a corresponding increased grain yield of chickpea.
Inhibition of mycelial growth could further be explained by the multisite activity of the fungicide such as Milraz (Propineb and Cymoxanil), which inhibits synthesis of nucleic acids, amino acids, and other cellular processes [25].