furuncle

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fu·run·cle

 (fyo͝or′ŭng′kəl)
n.
See boil2.

[Latin fūrunculus, knob on a vine that "steals" the sap, diminutive of fūr, thief (modeled on latrunculus, robber, diminutive of latrō, latrōn-, bandit); see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

fu·run′cu·lar (fyo͝o-rŭng′kyə-lər), fu·run′cu·lous (-ləs) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

furuncle

(ˈfjʊərʌŋkəl)
n
(Pathology) pathol the technical name for boil2
[C17: from Latin fūrunculus pilferer, petty thief, sore on the body, from fūr thief]
furuncular, fuˈrunculous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

boil1

(bɔɪl)
v.i.
1. to change from a liquid to a gaseous state, typically as a result of heat, producing bubbles of gas that rise to the surface of the liquid.
2. to reach the boiling point.
3. to be in an agitated or violent state: The sea boiled in the storm.
4. to be deeply angry or upset.
5. to contain, or be contained in, a liquid that boils: The kettle is boiling. Don't let the vegetables boil.
v.t.
6. to bring to the boiling point.
7. to cook (something) in boiling water: to boil eggs.
8. to separate (salt, sugar, etc.) from a solution containing it by boiling off the liquid.
9. boil down,
a. to reduce or lessen by boiling.
b. to shorten; abridge.
10. boil down to, to be reduced to; amount to: It boils down to a question of ethics.
11. boil over,
a. to overflow while or as if while boiling; erupt.
b. to be unable to repress anger, excitement, etc.
n.
12. the act or state of boiling: Bring the water to a boil.
13. an area of agitated, swirling water.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French boillir < Latin bullīre to effervesce, boil, v. derivative of bulla bubble]
syn: boil, seethe, simmer, stew are used figuratively to refer to agitated states of emotion. To boil suggests being very hot with anger or rage: He was boiling when the guests arrived late. To seethe is to be deeply stirred, violently agitated, or greatly excited: a mind seething with conflicting ideas. To simmer means to be at the point of bursting out or boiling over: to simmer with curiosity; to simmer with anger. To stew is an informal term that means to worry, or to be in a restless state of anxiety and excitement: to stew over one's troubles.

boil2

(bɔɪl)

n.
a painful circumscribed inflammation of the skin with a pus-filled inner core.
[before 1000; Middle English bile, bule, Old English bȳle; c. Old Saxon bula, Old High German bulla; akin to Old Norse beyla hump]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.furuncle - a painful sore with a hard core filled with pus
gumboil - a boil or abscess on the gums
staphylococcal infection - an infection with staphylococcus bacteria; usually marked by abscess formation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

fu·run·cle

n. furúnculo; pop. grano enterrado.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

furuncle

n forúnculo, infección f de un folículo piloso
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.