fuscous


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fus·cous

 (fŭs′kəs)
adj.
Dark brownish-gray in color.

[From Latin fuscus.]

fuscous

(ˈfʌskəs)
adj
(Colours) of a brownish-grey colour
[C17: from Latin fuscus dark, swarthy, tawny]

fus•cous

(ˈfʌs kəs)

adj.
of brownish gray or dusky color.
[1655–65; < Latin fuscus; see -ous]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fuscous - of something having a dusky brownish grey color
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue
References in periodicals archive ?
tau: a mediumsized species; abdominal terga III-IV fulvous with a black "T" pattern and anterolateral corners of terga IV and V with broad black markings; face fulvous with a pair of medium-sized circular to oval black spots; wings with a narrow dark fuscous costal band overlapping wing veins [R.
tenuipennis are pale yellowish-greenish with a near vertical face, sparse minute fuscous speckles over much of the body, a pale stripe on the midline of the pronotum, short, filiform antennae, no stripe on the hind femur, and milky white spots separated by pale reddish spaces on the surface of the compound eye (Fig.
General color antimony yellow, becoming dull buckthorn brown on the abdomen, the shaft of the pronotum washed with ferruginous; limbs of the body color passing into weak and pale turtle green, the spines fuscous tipped; head with the occiput washed with dull mummy brown, eyes dresden brown.
Tegmina hyaline, fuscous along veins, infuscate area between Cu vein and claval suture, on M1, M2 and M 3+4 veins, last two apical cells, and apex of clavus (Fig.
ambit imbrication aulic meretricious crapulous rubric factitious squamous fuscous tendentious
ETYMOLOGY: From Latin aquilus, meaning blackish, dark colored, referring to the generally fuscous coloration.
Wings 22 mm long, three times longer than wider, ferruginous, with apical half of forewing fuscous having a purple refection .
Humphries' fondness for obscure words, such as lacunary, viscid and fuscous, is well indulged here, as is his outrageous, satirical sense of humour.
Humphries's fondness for obscure words, such as lacunary, viscid and fuscous, is well indulged here, as is his outrageous, satirical sense of humour.