gyrus

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Related to fusiform gyrus: amygdala, lingual gyrus

gy·rus

 (jī′rəs)
n. pl. gy·ri (-rī′)
A rounded ridge, as on the surfaces of the cerebral hemispheres.

[Latin gȳrus, circle; see gyre.]

gyrus

(ˈdʒaɪrəs)
n, pl gyri (ˈdʒaɪraɪ)
another name for convolution3
[C19: from Latin; see gyre]

gy•rus

(ˈdʒaɪ rəs)

n., pl. gy•ri (ˈdʒaɪ raɪ)
a convoluted fold of the brain.
[1835–45; < Latin gȳrus; see gyre]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gyrus - a convex fold or elevation in the surface of the brain
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
frontal gyrus - any of the convolutions of the outer surface of the frontal lobe of the cerebrum
temporal gyrus - any of the convolutions of the outer surface of the temporal lobe of the cerebrum
parietal gyrus - any of the convolutions of the outer surface of the parietal lobe of the cerebrum
occipital gyrus - any of the convolutions of the outer surface of the occipital lobe of the cerebrum
cerebrum - anterior portion of the brain consisting of two hemispheres; dominant part of the brain in humans
central gyrus - either of two gyri on either side of the central sulcus
Translations

gy·rus

n. L. circunvolución, porción elevada de la corteza cerebral;
Broca's ______ de Broca, tercera, frontal inferior;
frontal, superior ______ frontal superior;
inferior, lateral occipital ______ occipital inferior lateral;
superior occipital ______ occipital superior.
References in periodicals archive ?
Colored region-of-interest boxes on the scanned image correspond to areas shown in (B through D) (hippocampal sector CA 1 =blue, and occipitotemporal (OT) cortex of fusiform gyrus = red).
From there, it travels to the left fusiform gyrus, otherwise known as the brain's "letterbox".
These participants also displayed reduced gray matter within an area of the brain called the fusiform gyrus, which is important for face processing and social cognition.
sup][16] reported that gray matter volume was reduced in the left precentral gyrus and right fusiform gyrus in patients with depressive cognitive tendencies compared to that in healthy controls.
Some studies indicated reduced grey matter volume in the temporal lobe, particularly in the superior temporal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, and medial temporal gyrus in people with schizophrenia (chronic and first-episode schizophrenia) [65-68].
Consistent findings have been reported in healthy and clinical populations, describing the increase in the BOLD response when aversive affective faces are compared to neutral faces, mainly in the amygdala; frontal regions such as the superior frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, and ventromedial cortex; temporal regions including the superior and medial temporal gyrus; other regions such as the fusiform gyrus, insula, anterior cingulate, among other structures [8-11].
The combination group showed significant increases in metabolism in a number of regions, including the right hemisphere cluster (insula/putamen/ amygdala/superior and middle temporal region); the left middle temporal pole fusiform gyrus and anterior temporal region; the right middle and inferior frontal region; and the right rolandic opercula.
When children had drawn a letter freehand, they exhibited increased activity in three areas of the brain that are activated in adults when they read and write: the left fusiform gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus and the posterior parietal cortex.
For instance, it has been previously established that faces are processed by a specific modular region of the ventral temporal cortex known as fusiform gyrus area (FFA) (Kanwisher et al, 1997; Kanwisher & Yove, 2006).
Functional MR showed improved blood flow in three brain regions involved with encoding and memorization of nonverbal associations: the right lingual gyrus, the occipital fusiform gyrus, and the right frontal pole.
This patch of cells, in the fusiform gyrus, doesn't respond as strongly to letters arranged nonsensically and ignores words spoken aloud.
On functional MRI, dysthymic patients show significantly more right amygdala, right thalamic, right fusiform gyrus, and left cerebellar activity, compared with controls for the negative-neutral contrast.