fusion bomb


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fusion bomb

n.
A nuclear bomb, especially a hydrogen bomb, that derives its released energy principally from fusion reactions among light nuclei.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fusion bomb

n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a type of bomb in which most of the energy is provided by nuclear fusion, esp the fusion of hydrogen isotopes. Also called: thermonuclear bomb or fission-fusion bomb See also hydrogen bomb
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy′drogen bomb`


n.
a bomb, more powerful than an atomic bomb, that derives its explosive energy from the thermonuclear fusion reaction of hydrogen isotopes. Also called H-bomb.
[1945–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fusion bomb - a nuclear weapon that releases atomic energy by union of light (hydrogen) nuclei at high temperatures to form helium
bomb - an explosive device fused to explode under specific conditions
atomic weapon, nuclear weapon - a weapon of mass destruction whose explosive power derives from a nuclear reaction
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Novae like this are similar to a fusion bomb, and studying them helps researchers to better understand the physics behind such explosions.
Where: Fusion Bomb Studios (inside Blairally Arcade), 245 Blair Blvd.
A fission bomb, which eventually would prove to be limited to a yield of half a megaton, was the scientists' assigned goal, but Teller attempted to focus deliberations on the more challenging fusion bomb, with its prospect of virtually unlimited yield.
He became chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission's (AEC's) General Advisory Committee and continued his campaign, begun while still at Los Alamos, to block the development of the far more powerful fusion bomb and to argue for greater openness and international control of nuclear technology.
There, technicians trained in handling nuclear materials would add the tritium or deuterium composites that turn a plain old fission bomb into a massive thermonuclear fusion bomb.
In either ease, when the burned-out star reaches a critical mass, about 1.4 times as heavy as the sun, its density is great enough to trigger a fusion bomb of stellar proportions.