fussed


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms.
Related to fussed: fused, fuzed

fuss

 (fŭs)
n.
1. Needlessly nervous or useless activity; commotion: There was a lot of fuss on moving day.
2.
a. A state of excessive and unwarranted concern over an unimportant matter: made a big fuss over one low test grade.
b. An objection; a protest: The longer working hours caused a big fuss.
3. A quarrel.
4. A display of affectionate excitement and attention: Everyone made a fuss over the new baby.
v. fussed, fuss·ing, fuss·es
v.intr.
1. To trouble or worry over trifles.
2. To be excessively careful or solicitous: fussed over their children.
3. To get into or be in a state of nervous or useless activity: fussed with the collar of his coat.
4. To object; complain.
v.tr.
To disturb or vex with unimportant matters.

[Origin unknown.]

fuss′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fussed

(fʌst)
adj
Brit bothered or perturbed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

fussed

[fʌst] ADJ (Brit) I'm not fussedme da igual, me da lo mismo
I'm not fussed about going to the partyme da igual or lo mismo ir a la fiesta que no
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fussed

adj (Brit inf) I’m not fussed (about it)es ist mir egal; he wasn’t fussed about getting back to Belfastes war ihm egal, ob er nach Belfast zurückging
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
He was n't respectful at all; he called her "the old lady," and told her he "would n't be fussed over"; but when anything was the matter, he always went to "the old lady," and was very grateful for the "fussing." Polly liked him for this, and often wanted to speak of it; but she had a feeling that it would n't do, for in praising their affection, she was reproaching others with neglect; so she held her tongue, and thought about it all the more.
"Do not make a fuss" (as a matter of fact Polina never at any time either fussed or wept).