fuzzy-wuzzy


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fuzzy-wuzzy

(ˈfʌzɪˌwʌzɪ)
n, pl -wuzzies or -wuzzy
(Peoples) archaic offensive slang a Black fuzzy-haired native of any of various countries
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References in periodicals archive ?
When we're talking about fat cats this ideologically driven, not to mention Cheshire-brainy, to ask them to forswear a mission they were brought up to hold dear--namely, a quest for supremacy, one whose methodology makes no distinction between the marketplace and the marketplace of ideas--for the sake of a bunch of fuzzy-wuzzy ideals they've never even pretended to subscribe to is a nonstarter.
Though not quite as short as I used to, not since a co-worker noted how my hair's penchant for growing straight up until it weighs enough to topple over left the back of my head looking like a bear's posterior and I earned the nickname fuzzy-wuzzy.
He loves all the animals on our little farm and is a total softy when it comes to any fuzzy-wuzzy little critter.
Chuck those fuzzy-wuzzy cotton swabs you've been using for years to get down there into the guts of your guns.
3a) Battle of Corunna during the Peninsular War (the burial of Sir John Moore); b) Laurence Binyon's First World War poem "To the Fallen" (the poem's next verse is probably better known--"They shaft grow not old"); c) "After Bienheim" (the first of Marlborough's four principal victories); d) The Nile (Nelson's victory), "Casablanca" was a midshipman, the French admiral's son; e) Rupert Brooke's "The Soldier" (written while en route to Gallipoli); f) Everyone should get The Charge of the Light Brigade; g) Fuzzy-wuzzy by Kipling, Sudan, 1883; h) Kipling again, the Afghan wars, 1878-80.
A curious item among the acquisitions is a fancy dress shirt worn by Gurney during the 1948 Journalists' Ball, smothered back and front with drawings of characters from Gurney strips--portraits of Bluey and Curley with a Fuzzy-Wuzzy Angel (New Guinea native), a very whiskery swaggy, a large moustached pukka airforce officer, Roy (Mo) Rene from Gurney's first humour strip of 1927, Stiffy and Mo, and caricatures of politicians Ben Chifley, Arthur Caldwell and Billy Hughes.
Latter sequence merrily satirizes cliffhanger serials with fake natives by having these indigenous cast members (some from "Ten Canoes") overact in silly grass skirts and fuzzy-wuzzy wigs.