gaberdine

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gab·er·dine

 (găb′ər-dēn′, găb′ər-dēn′)
n.
1. A long, coarse cloak or frock worn especially by Jews during the Middle Ages. Also called gabardine.
2. Chiefly British A laborer's long loose smock.
3. See gabardine.

[Obsolete French gauvardine, from Old French galvardine, perhaps from Middle High German wallevart, pilgrimage : wallen, to roam (from Old High German wallōn; see wel- in Indo-European roots) + vart, journey (from Old High German, from faran, to go; see per- in Indo-European roots).]

gaberdine

(ˈɡæbəˌdiːn; ˌɡæbəˈdiːn)
n
(Textiles) a variant spelling of gabardine

gab•er•dine

(ˈgæb ərˌdin, ˌgæb ərˈdin)

n.
1. Also, gabardine. a long, loose coat or frock for men, worn in the Middle Ages, esp. by Jews.
[1510–20; < Middle French gauvardine, gallevardine < Sp gabardina]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gaberdine - a loose coverall (coat or frock) reaching down to the anklesgaberdine - a loose coverall (coat or frock) reaching down to the ankles
coverall - a loose-fitting protective garment that is worn over other clothing
Translations

gaberdine

[ˌgæbəˈdiːn] N (= cloth, raincoat) → gabardina f

gaberdine

[ˌgæbəˈdiːn] n (material) → gabardine m; (coat) → (soprabito di) gabardine
References in classic literature ?
One morning the tramp docked at Alexandria, and from the deck he looked at the city, white in the sunlight, and the crowd on the wharf; he saw the natives in their shabby gabardines, the blacks from the Soudan, the noisy throng of Greeks and Italians, the grave Turks in tarbooshes, the sunshine and the blue sky; and something happened to him.
Then getting upon the animal with more alacrity and haste than could have been anticipated from his years, he lost no time in so disposing of the skirts of his gabardine as to conceal completely from observation the burden which he had thus deposited en croupe.
There is an English garrison at Gibraltar of 6,000 or 7,000 men, and so uniforms of flaming red are plenty; and red and blue, and undress costumes of snowy white, and also the queer uniform of the bare-kneed Highlander; and one sees soft-eyed Spanish girls from San Roque, and veiled Moorish beauties (I suppose they are beauties) from Tarifa, and turbaned, sashed, and trousered Moorish merchants from Fez, and long- robed, bare-legged, ragged Muhammadan vagabonds from Tetuan and Tangier, some brown, some yellow and some as black as virgin ink--and Jews from all around, in gabardine, skullcap, and slippers, just as they are in pictures and theaters, and just as they were three thousand years ago, no doubt.