gaberdine


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gab·er·dine

 (găb′ər-dēn′, găb′ər-dēn′)
n.
1. A long, coarse cloak or frock worn especially by Jews during the Middle Ages. Also called gabardine.
2. Chiefly British A laborer's long loose smock.
3. See gabardine.

[Obsolete French gauvardine, from Old French galvardine, perhaps from Middle High German wallevart, pilgrimage : wallen, to roam (from Old High German wallōn; see wel- in Indo-European roots) + vart, journey (from Old High German, from faran, to go; see per- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gaberdine

(ˈɡæbəˌdiːn; ˌɡæbəˈdiːn)
n
(Textiles) a variant spelling of gabardine
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gab•er•dine

(ˈgæb ərˌdin, ˌgæb ərˈdin)

n.
1. Also, gabardine. a long, loose coat or frock for men, worn in the Middle Ages, esp. by Jews.
[1510–20; < Middle French gauvardine, gallevardine < Sp gabardina]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gaberdine - a loose coverall (coat or frock) reaching down to the anklesgaberdine - a loose coverall (coat or frock) reaching down to the ankles
coverall - a loose-fitting protective garment that is worn over other clothing
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

gaberdine

[ˌgæbəˈdiːn] N (= cloth, raincoat) → gabardina f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gaberdine

[ˌgæbəˈdiːn] n (material) → gabardine m; (coat) → (soprabito di) gabardine
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
I am an impoverished wretch the very gaberdine I wear is borrowed from Reuben of Tadcaster.''
It is easy, then, in fancy, to people these silent canals with plumed gallants and fair ladies--with Shylocks in gaberdine and sandals, venturing loans upon the rich argosies of Venetian commerce--with Othellos and Desdemonas, with Iagos and Roderigos--with noble fleets and victorious legions returning from the wars.
Mine eye catches at times a flash and sparkle among yonder houses which assuredly never came from shipman's jacket or the gaberdine of a burgher."
He was an unshaven little man in a threadbare coat like a gaberdine, with his feet in slippers, and I thought him a harmless fool.
As he toiled on before, with his palm upon the stair-rail, and his long black skirt, a very gaberdine, overhanging each successive step, he might have been the leader in some pilgrimage of devotional ascent to a prophet's tomb.
He was old, and his woollen gaberdine still reeked of the stinking artemisia of the mountain passes.
Sally said: "She left Edith at work when she got married and later took up sewing again when she began to make Gaberdine mackintoshes for the Retlaw's store, on New Street in Huddersfield.
Cosyfeet reports that sales of men's shoes have responded to a 25% range expansion in recent years, with customers now more frequently selecting different colours such as Tan shades, Gaberdine and Oxblood over traditional black and brown, as well as having an eye for more characterful leather finishes such as nubuck.
In The Merchant of Venice, Shylock is anguished at being considered as lowly as a dog: "You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine," cries the moneylender.