gabfest

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gab·fest

 (găb′fĕst′)
n. Slang
1. An informal gathering or session for the exchange of news, opinions, and gossip.
2. A long, lively conversation or discussion.

gabfest

(ˈɡæbfɛst)
n
1. prolonged gossiping or conversation
2. an informal gathering for conversation
[C19: from gab1 + fest]

gab•fest

(ˈgæbˌfɛst)

n. Informal.
1. a gathering at which there is a great deal of conversation.
2. a long conversation.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gabfest - light informal conversation for social occasionsgabfest - light informal conversation for social occasions
chat, confab, confabulation, schmoose, schmooze - an informal conversation
References in periodicals archive ?
In between, he made the 13-hour flight to Los Angeles, availed himself to late-night couches and early-morning gabfests, and then made the 14-hour flight back.
You two are a bit disruptive at times with your gabfests .
For those who missed last weekend's gabfests on TV.
Most of my best gabfests with my father and brother have been during walks.
From the Gabfests to the book club, to the digital manners podcast, Slate has its writers discussing a wide array of topics for all the world to hear.
The meetings, which bring together ministers and delegations from ASEAN and partners such the United States, China and Japan, are generally known as friendly gabfests in which the sides all congratulate each other on cooperation.
I mean, you would arrive for your Sunday morning gabfests that would include anywhere from three to 10 other keeners and he would be onto something and he wouldn't stop.
Such activities merely interrupt the sequence of independently organized marathon gabfests.
But in the September-to-June syndic season, none oft the nine holdover talkshows added viewers (five of the gabfests actually plummeted by double digits in household Nielsens).
Today Eliza Lucas Pinckney would be the subject of talk-show gabfests and made-for-TV movies, a child prodigy turned into a celebrity.
We must rely on Jon Stewart's fake news reports on The Daily Show to illustrate the point, as he and his bevy of crazed contributors continue to turn out comedy sketches that offer a truer picture than do the so-called journalists of the Sunday-morning gabfests and cable food fights.
Web strategy is now central, not marginal, to the campaigns; political weblogs have continued their spectacular growth; and the scrutinizers' gazes have shifted from the op-ed pages and weekend gabfests to the nuts-and-bolts reporting itself.