gable

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ga·ble

 (gā′bəl)
n.
1.
a. The generally triangular section of wall at the end of a pitched roof, occupying the space between the two slopes of the roof.
b. The whole end wall of a building or wing having a pitched roof.
2. A triangular, usually ornamental architectural section, as one above an arched door or window.

[Middle English gable, gavel, from Norman French gable (perhaps of Celtic origin) and from Old Norse gafl; see ghebh-el- in Indo-European roots.]

ga′bled adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gable

(ˈɡeɪbəl)
n
1. (Architecture) the triangular upper part of a wall between the sloping ends of a pitched roof
2. (Architecture) a triangular ornamental feature in the form of a gable, esp as used over a door or window
3. (Architecture) the triangular wall on both ends of a gambrel roof
[C14: Old French gable, probably from Old Norse gafl; related to Old English geafol fork, Old High German gibil gable]
ˈgabled adj
ˈgable-ˌlike adj

Gable

(ˈɡeɪbəl)
n
(Biography) (William) Clark. 1901–60, US film actor. His films include It Happened One Night (1934), San Francisco (1936), Gone with the Wind (1939), Mogambo (1953), and The Misfits (1960)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ga•ble

(ˈgeɪ bəl)

n.
1. the portion of the front or side of a building, usu. triangular in shape, enclosed by or masking the end of a roof that slopes downward from a central ridge.
2. a decorative architectural feature suggesting a triangular gable.
3. Also called ga′ble wall`. a wall topped by a gable.
[1325–75; Middle English < Old French (of Germanic orig.); c. Old Norse gafl; compare Old English gafol, geafel a fork]
ga′bled, adj.
ga′ble•like`, adj.

Ga•ble

(ˈgeɪ bəl)

n.
(William) Clark, 1901–60, U.S. film actor.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gable - the vertical triangular wall between the sloping ends of gable roofgable - the vertical triangular wall between the sloping ends of gable roof
bell gable - an extension of a gable that serves as a bell cote
corbie gable - (architecture) a gable having corbie-steps or corbel steps
pediment - a triangular gable between a horizontal entablature and a sloping roof
wall - an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
2.gable - United States film actor (1901-1960)Gable - United States film actor (1901-1960)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
سَقْف هَرَمي
štít
gavl
oromfal
húsgafl
dvišlaitis
frontons
üçgen çatının ön duvarı

gable

[ˈgeɪbl]
A. Naguilón m, gablete m
B. CPD gable end Nhastial m
gable roof Ntejado m de dos aguas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gable

[ˈgeɪbəl] npignon m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

gable

nGiebel m

gable

:
gable end
nGiebelwand or -seite f
gable window
nGiebelfenster nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

gable

[ˈgeɪbl] nfrontone m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

gable

(ˈgeibl) noun
the triangular part of the side wall of a building between the sloping parts of the roof.
ˈgabled adjective
a gabled roof.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.