gadid

(redirected from gadids)

gadid

(ˈɡeɪdɪd)
n
(Animals) any marine teleost fish of the family Gadidae, which includes the cod, haddock, whiting, and pollack
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Gadidae
[C19: see gadoid]
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Past studies identified other gadids as also exhibiting Hb polymerization, including the following: poor cod, Gadus minutus (re-classified, Trisopterus minutus (Linnaeus, 1758)); whiting, Merlangius merlangus (Linnaeus, 1758); pouting cod, Gadus luscus (re-classified, Trisopterus luscus (Linnaeus, 1758)); and pollock, Pollachius pollachius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Yoffey, 1929); as well as the subspecies Baltic cod (G.
gracilis collections from geographically separated areas; 2) determine their cross-reactivity with other northern Pacific and Arctic ocean gadids and the ability of suites of these loci to accurately distinguish among species; and 3) evaluate differences in the allele profiles among M.
Trophic importance of some marine gadids in northern Alaska and their body-otolith size relationships.
Spironucleus species causes systemic spironucleosis in wild freshwater fish (salmonids, cichlids, anguilids and cyprinids) and marine fish (salmonids and gadids) from North America, Asia and Europe (POYNTON et al., 2004; TANZOLA; VANOTTI, 2008; WILLIAMS et al., 2011).
Similarly, Hosoki (1978) examined the diet of Yellow Irish Lords from the eastern Bering Sea and found hermit crabs, Chionoecetes, and other crabs to be dominant prey, followed by amphipods, Walleye Pollock, other gadids, and other fishes.
For seine and trawl catches, unidentified small flatfish (Pleuronectidae), gadids (Gadidae), pricklebacks (Stichaeidae), and sculpins (Cottidae) were counted in the total catch, but were not considered separate species for species richness calculations because at least one identifiable species from these taxa was captured; unidentified small snailfish and unidentified small poacher were considered separate species because no identifiable species from the families Liparidae and Agonidae were captured.
They cover new methodological approaches to the archaeology of fisheries; salmon in the context of regional and local variation, Pacific cod and other Gadids as cousins of the fish that changed the world, and herring and other little-known fish of the North Pacific coast.
of Winnipeg, Canada) present 13 essays examining the medieval and early modern history and archaeology of northern fisheries, including primarily the cod (and other gadids) and herring fisheries of the North Atlantic, the North Sea, and the western Baltic.
We speculated that Atlantic tomcod may be better able to exploit darkened habitats than other species we have examined (tautog and winter flounder) because previous work has demonstrated that other gadids may have increased chemo- or mechanosensory abilities that supplement visual foraging techniques (Bardach and Case, 1965; Doing and Selset, 1980; Pearson et al., 1980).
While formerly non-commercial species were being sold cheaply by the millions of tons, the slow-growing, high-value gadids and serranids, including Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), Cape hake (Merluccius capensis), and important blue fish like the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) and mackerel (Scomber scombrus), all declined.
Although studies on the behavior of Pacific cod are scarce, evidence has been collected from various field and laboratory experiments on other cold-water gadids and various demersal species, clearly showing that fish swimming stamina and reactions to trawling are species specific (He and Wardle, 1988; Winger et al., 1999), size dependent (Main and Sangster, 1981; He and Wardle, 1988; Winger et al., 1999), temperature affected (He, 1991; Winger et al., 1999), light responsive (Glass and Wardle, 1989; Walsh, 1991), and often density dependent (Godo et al., 1999; Kotwicki et al., 2014).
Sand lance dominated the diet (up to 99% FO) in the sandy Cape Cod area, whereas the more diverse diet at the rocky Isle of Shoals included rockfish, gadids, Atlantic herring, American plaice, and yellowtail flounder.