gaiter


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Related to gaiter: goiter

gai·ter

 (gā′tər)
n.
1.
a. A heavy cloth or leather covering for the leg extending from the instep to the ankle or knee.
b. A similar covering of moisture-resistant fabric, used by skiers and hikers.
2. An ankle-high shoe with elastic sides.
3. An overshoe with a cloth top.
4. A tubular collar fitting closely around the neck, often worn by skiers.

[French guêtre, from Old French guietre, of Germanic origin; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

gaiter

(ˈɡeɪtə)
n (often plural)
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a cloth or leather covering for the leg or ankle buttoned on one side and usually strapped under the foot
2. (Clothing & Fashion) Also called: spat a similar covering extending from the ankle to the instep
3. (Mountaineering) a waterproof covering for the ankle worn by climbers and walkers to prevent snow, mud, or gravel entering over the top of the boot
4. (Clothing & Fashion) a waterproof covering for the ankle worn by climbers and walkers to prevent snow, mud, or gravel entering over the top of the boot
[C18: from French guêtre, probably of Germanic origin and related to wrist]
ˈgaiterless adj

gait•er

(ˈgeɪ tər)

n.
1. a cloth or leather covering for the ankle and instep and sometimes also the lower leg, worn over the shoe or boot.
2. a cloth or leather shoe with elastic insertions at the sides.
3. an overshoe with a cloth top.
[1765–75; < French guêtre, Middle French guiestre, guestre, c. German Rist ankle, wrist. See wrist]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gaiter - a cloth covering (a legging) that covers the instep and anklesgaiter - a cloth covering (a legging) that covers the instep and ankles
leg covering, legging, leging - a garment covering the leg (usually extending from the knee to the ankle)
2.gaiter - a shoe covering the ankle with elastic gores in the sides
gore, panel - a piece of cloth that is generally triangular or tapering; used in making garments or umbrellas or sails
shoe - footwear shaped to fit the foot (below the ankle) with a flexible upper of leather or plastic and a sole and heel of heavier material
3.gaiter - legging consisting of a cloth or leather covering for the leg from the knee to the ankle
leg covering, legging, leging - a garment covering the leg (usually extending from the knee to the ankle)
Translations
nilkkainsääryssäärystin

gaiter

[ˈgeɪtəʳ] Npolaina f

gaiter

nGamasche f

gaiter

[ˈgeɪtəʳ] nghetta
References in classic literature ?
They crept and crept, the hem of her petticoat just touching his gaiter, and his elbow sometimes brushing hers.
When Edna knocked at Mademoiselle Reisz's front room door and entered, she discovered that person standing beside the window, engaged in mending or patching an old prunella gaiter.
Not content with paying the nation in general the compliment of invariably carrying an umbrella, and invariably wearing gaiters and a white hat, the Professor further aspired to become an Englishman in his habits and amusements, as well as in his personal appearance.
He held a bundle made up of an old faded silk handkerchief that apparently contained all his travelling wardrobe, and wore thick shoes and gaiters, his whole appearance being very un-Russian.
With an old sheepskin knapsack at his back, and a rough, unbarked stick cut out of some wood in his hand; miry, footsore, his shoes and gaiters trodden out, his hair and beard untrimmed; the cloak he carried over his shoulder, and the clothes he wore, sodden with wet; limping along in pain and difficulty; he looked as if the clouds were hurrying from him, as if the wail of the wind and the shuddering of the grass were directed against him, as if the low mysterious plashing of the water murmured at him, as if the fitful autumn night were disturbed by him.
Michel Ardan, always easy, dressed in thorough traveler's costume, leathern gaiters on his legs, pouch by his side, in loose velvet suit, cigar in mouth, was full of inexhaustible gayety, laughing, joking, playing pranks with J.
Having finished all his business, soaked through with the streams of water which kept running down the leather behind his neck and his gaiters, but in the keenest and most confident temper, Levin returned homewards in the evening.
He wore a shooting suit of brown tweed, with a hat to match, and neat gaiters.
When the bell was rung, a head appeared between the interstices of the dining-room shutters, and the door was opened by a man in drab breeches and gaiters, with a dirty old coat, a foul old neckcloth lashed round his bristly neck, a shining bald head, a leering red face, a pair of twinkling grey eyes, and a mouth perpetually on the grin.
We were all dressed alike: broad slouch hats, to keep the sun off; gray knapsacks; blue army shirts; blue overalls; leathern gaiters buttoned tight from knee down to ankle; high-quarter coarse shoes snugly laced.
The apartment and furniture would have been nothing extraordinary as belonging to a homely, northern farmer, with a stubborn countenance, and stalwart limbs set out to advantage in knee- breeches and gaiters.
I see already his muscular calves encased in the gaiters episcopal.