mucopolysaccharide

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mu·co·pol·y·sac·cha·ride

 (myo͞o′kō-pŏl′ē-săk′ə-rīd′)
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mucopolysaccharide

(ˌmjuːkəʊˌpɒlɪˈsækəraɪd)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of a group of complex polysaccharides composed of repeating units of two sugars, one of which contains an amino group
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gly•cos•a•mi•no•gly•can

(ˌglaɪ koʊs əˌmi noʊˈglaɪ kæn)

n.
any of a class of polysaccharides that form mucins when complexed with proteins. Formerly, mucopolysaccharide.
[1975–80; glyco- + (hexo)samin(e) a hexose derivative + -o- + glycan polysaccharide]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mucopolysaccharide - complex polysaccharides containing an amino group; occur chiefly as components of connective tissue
hyaluronic acid - a viscous mucopolysaccharide found in the connective tissue space and the synovial fluid of movable joints and the humors of the eye; a cementing and protective substance
polyose, polysaccharide - any of a class of carbohydrates whose molecules contain chains of monosaccharide molecules
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ohgane et al., "The correlation between molecular weight and antitumor activity of galactosaminoglycan (CO-N) from Cordyceps ophioglossoides," Chemical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, vol.
One member of this family is versican, a protein glycosylated with galactosaminoglycan side chains and which is increased in tumors compared to normal tissue (as discussed in [49, 50]).
Galactosaminoglycan oligosaccharides from Ch, Ch4S, Ch6S, desulfated DS and ChS E were prepared as donors.