galaxy

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gal·ax·y

 (găl′ək-sē)
n. pl. gal·ax·ies
1. Astronomy
a. Any of numerous large-scale aggregates of stars, gas, and dust that constitute the universe, containing an average of 100 billion (1011) solar masses and ranging in diameter from 1,500 to 300,000 light-years.
b. often Galaxy The Milky Way.
2. An assembly of brilliant, glamorous, or distinguished persons or things: a galaxy of theatrical performers.

[Middle English galaxie, the Milky Way, from Late Latin galaxiās, from Greek, from gala, galakt-, milk; see melg- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

galaxy

(ˈɡæləksɪ)
n, pl -axies
1. (Astronomy) any of a vast number of star systems held together by gravitational attraction in an asymmetric shape (an irregular galaxy) or, more usually, in a symmetrical shape (a regular galaxy), which is either a spiral or an ellipse. Former names: island universe or extragalactic nebula
2. a splendid gathering, esp one of famous or distinguished people
[C14 (in the sense: the Milky Way), from Medieval Latin galaxia, from Latin galaxias, from Greek, from gala milk; related to Latin lac milk]

Galaxy

(ˈɡæləksɪ)
n
(Celestial Objects) the Galaxy the spiral galaxy, approximately 100 000 light years in diameter, that contains the solar system about three fifths of the distance from its centre. Also known as: the Milky Way System See also Magellanic Cloud
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gal•ax•y

(ˈgæl ək si)

n., pl. -ax•ies.
1.
a. a large system of stars held together by mutual gravitation and isolated from similar systems by vast regions of space.
b. (usu. cap.) Milky Way.
2. any large and brilliant or impressive assemblage of persons or things: a galaxy of opera stars.
[1350–1400; Middle English galaxie, galaxias < Medieval Latin galaxia,galaxias, ultimately < Greek galaxías kýklos the Milky Way; see galacto-]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

gal·ax·y

(găl′ək-sē)
Any of numerous large-scale collections of stars, gas, and dust that make up the universe. A galaxy may range in diameter from 1,500 to 300,000 light-years.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Galaxy

 an assembly of brillant or noted persons or things. See also constellation.
Examples: galaxy of ability, 1887; of astronomers—Lipton, 1970; of beauty, 1704; of brightness, 1762; of fame, 1649; of governesses; of joy, 1842; of stars; of wax candles, 1862.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

galaxy

Galaxies are collections of stars and planets and clouds of gas or dust that form “islands” in the emptiness of space. A recent theory claims much of this is occupied by invisible dark matter. Most galaxies are found in groups; very few are found on their own.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.galaxy - a splendid assemblage (especially of famous people)
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
2.galaxy - tufted evergreen perennial herb having spikes of tiny white flowers and glossy green round to heart-shaped leaves that become coppery to maroon or purplish in fall
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Galax - evergreen herbs of southeastern United States
3.galaxy - (astronomy) a collection of star systemsgalaxy - (astronomy) a collection of star systems; any of the billions of systems each having many stars and nebulae and dust; "`extragalactic nebula' is a former name for `galaxy'"
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
spiral galaxy, spiral nebula - a galaxy having a spiral structure; arms containing younger stars spiral out from old stars at the center
Great Attractor - a massive grouping of galaxies in the direction of Centaurus and Hydra whose gravitational attraction is believed to cause deviations in the paths of other galaxies
Milky Way, Milky Way Galaxy, Milky Way System - the galaxy containing the solar system; consists of millions of stars that can be seen as a diffuse band of light stretching across the night sky
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
cosmos, macrocosm, universe, world, existence, creation - everything that exists anywhere; "they study the evolution of the universe"; "the biggest tree in existence"
cosmic dust - clouds of particles or gases occurring throughout interstellar space
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

galaxy

noun
1. star system, solar system, nebula Astronomers have discovered a distant galaxy.
2. array, gathering, assembly, assemblage a galaxy of famous movie stars
Related words
adjective galactic
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مِجَرَّهمَجموعَة من المَشاهير
galaxieMléčná dráhapřehlídkaspolečnost
galaksestjernerække
galaktika
galaksiLinnunrata
csillagvárosgalaxishírességek
galaksi
glæsilegur hópurvetrarbraut, stjörnuòoka
galaktikaplejada
galaktikaplejāde
melkwegsterrenstelsel
Droga Mlecznagalaktyka
galáxiaVia Láctea
galaxie
galaxia
ozvezdje
galaxVintergatan
galaksigökadaseçkin toplulukyıldız kümesi

galaxy

[ˈgæləksɪ] N (Astron) → galaxia f (fig) → constelación f, pléyade f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

galaxy

[ˈgæləksi] ngalaxie f
the Galaxy → la Galaxie
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

galaxy

n
(Astron) → Milchstraße f, → Sternsystem nt, → Galaxis f (spec); the Galaxydie Milchstraße, die Galaxis (spec)
(fig)Schar f, → Heer nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

galaxy

[ˈgæləksɪ] ngalassia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

galaxy

(ˈgӕləksi) plural ˈgalaxies noun
1. a very large group of stars.
2. a large group of famous, impressive etc people, things etc. a galaxy of entertainers; a galaxy of new cars.
the Galaxythe Milky Wayunder milk
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
But in health the mind is presently seen again,--its overarching vault, bright with galaxies of immutable lights, and the warm loves and fears that swept over us as clouds must lose their finite character and blend with God, to attain their own perfection.
The discovery of IC 335, which is part of a galaxy group containing a trio of other galaxies in the Fornax Cluster, was made public on Christmas Eve, with NASA posting about the discovery on its Facebook page.
Washington, Feb 24 ( ANI ): Researchers at Niels Bohr Institute have detected a stream of stars in one of the Andromeda Galaxy's outer satellite galaxies, a dwarf galaxy called Andromeda II.
Astronomers have discovered the first example of a trio of quasars, the brilliant beacons of light that seem to be fueled by supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. The triplet adds to earlier evidence that supermassive black holes and galaxies grow in lockstep.
Visible to the naked eye, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are two of the Milky Way's closest companion galaxies. Scientists have assumed that these groups of stars have been orbiting the Milky Way for billions of years.
The picture shows the small galaxies bunching together within the larger one, capturing an event that dates from just 3 billion years after the Big Bang.
Researchers have assumed that most younger galaxies are misshapen and full of chaotically moving gas.
Astronomers have discovered two dwarf galaxies that are being devoured by the Milky Way.
In an upcoming Nature, researchers report using the Hubble Space Telescope to analyze the home galaxies of 42 long-duration gamma-ray bursts.
That's the startling situation that astronomers have stumbled upon as they've looked deep into space and thus back to a time when newborn galaxies filled the cosmos.
To make sense of the arrangement of starlit galaxies and brilliant quasars across the sky; Volker Springel of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, Germany, and his colleagues based their work on dark matter.
Just as blowing leaves suggest the presence of wind, the motions of visible matter such as stars and galaxies betray the gravitational pull of dark matter.