gallamine


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Related to gallamine: Atracurium, Pancuronium, Suxamethonium

gallamine

(ˈɡæləˌmiːn)
n
1. (Pharmacology) pharmacol a neuromuscular blocking agent used in anaesthesia. In full: gallamine triethiodide
2. (Chemistry) gallamine blue a type of mordant dye
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gallamine - neuromuscular blocking agent (trade name Flaxedil) used as a muscle relaxant in the administration of anesthesia
muscle relaxant - a drug that reduces muscle contractility by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses or by decreasing the excitability of the motor end plate or by other actions
neuromuscular blocking agent - a substance that interferes with the neural transmission between motor neurons and skeletal muscles
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References in periodicals archive ?
Individuals were then lightly anesthetized with a buffered MS-222 solution (~5-mg/L) and the neuromuscular blocking drug gallamine triethiodide (Flaxedil, Sigma Chemical Co., St.
Among the established agents, tubocurarine, gallamine, and pancuronium exert significant cardiovascular effects; atracurium and mivacurium produce minor changes in cardiovascular variables whereas vecuronium and rocuronium are associated with a high degree of cardiostability.
Gallamine was the first but its onset was long and duration was short.
Mushin reported clinical studies with the drug gallamine (7).
Gallamine (134) and alcuronium (135) are original ligands with such properties: gallamine suppresses the [[sup.3]H]NMS binding of cardiac muscarinic receptors ([M.sub.2] receptors) without competing with [[sup.3]H]NMS, whereas alcuronium enhances the [[sup.3]H]NMS binding.
Propidium or fasciculin, decidium, ethidium, gallamine, and drugs like donepezil, galantamine majorly bind to this site [30, 32, 35-40].
Fish were anesthetized by submersion in a solution of 2-phenoxyethanol (0.4 ml/1) and immobilized with an intramuscular injection of gallamine triethiodide (0.4 to 1.4 ml of 2 mg/kg Ringer's solution for the bluefin tuna; 0.4 ml of 50 mg/kg Ringer's solution for the chub mackerel; and 6 to 9 ml of 50 mg/kg Ringer's solution for the striped jack).
In contrast, gallamine (a non-depolarizing muscle relaxant) or the venom of the puff adder Bitis arietans reduced the force of contraction.