gallant


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gal·lant

 (găl′ənt)
adj.
1. Smartly or boldly stylish; dashing: a gallant feathered hat; cut a gallant figure at the coronation.
2.
a. Unflinching in battle or action; valiant: put up a gallant resistance to the attackers.
b. Nobly or selflessly resolute: made a gallant attempt to save her friend's reputation.
3. Stately; majestic: a gallant ship.
4.
a. Courteously attentive especially to women; chivalrous.
b. Flirtatious; amorous.
n. (gə-lănt′, -länt′, găl′ənt)
1. A fashionable young man.
2.
a. A man courteously attentive to women.
b. A male lover, especially one who is courteously attentive.
v. (gə-lănt′, -länt′) gal·lant·ed, gal·lant·ing, gal·lants
v.tr.
To woo or pay court to (a lady).
v.intr.
To play the gallant.

[Middle English galaunt, from Old French galant, present participle of galer, to rejoice, of Germanic origin; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

gal′lant·ly adv.

gallant

adj
1. brave and high-spirited; courageous and honourable; dashing: a gallant warrior.
2. (of a man) attentive to women; chivalrous
3. imposing; dignified; stately: a gallant ship.
4. archaic showy in dress
n
5. a woman's lover or suitor
6. a dashing or fashionable young man, esp one who pursues women
7. a brave, high-spirited, or adventurous man
vb
8. (when: intr, usually foll by with) to court or flirt (with)
9. (tr) to attend or escort (a woman)
[C15: from Old French galant, from galer to make merry, from gale enjoyment, pleasure, of Germanic origin; related to Old English wela weal2]
ˈgallantly adv
ˈgallantness n

gal•lant

(adj. ˈgæl ənt for 1, 3, 4; gəˈlænt, -ˈlɑnt, ˈgæl ənt for 2, 5; n. gəˈlænt, -ˈlɑnt, ˈgæl ənt; v. gəˈlænt, -ˈlɑnt)
adj.
1. brave, spirited, or noble-minded: a gallant knight; a gallant attempt.
2. attentive to women; chivalrous.
3. stately; grand: a gallant ship.
4. showy, colorful, or stylish, as in dress.
n.
5. a man exceptionally attentive to women.
6. a stylish and dashing man.
7. a suitor or lover.
v.t.
8. to court or act as a lover of (a woman).
9. to escort (a woman).
v.i.
10. to attend or pay court as a gallant.
[1350–1400; Middle English gala(u)nt < Old French galant, present participle of galer to amuse oneself, make merry < Gallo-Romance *walāre, derivative of Frankish *wala good, happy; see well1, weal1]
gal′lant•ly, adv.

Gal•lant

(ˈgæl ənt)
n.
Mavis, born 1922, Canadian short-story writer.

gallant


Past participle: gallanted
Gerund: gallanting

Imperative
gallant
gallant
Present
I gallant
you gallant
he/she/it gallants
we gallant
you gallant
they gallant
Preterite
I gallanted
you gallanted
he/she/it gallanted
we gallanted
you gallanted
they gallanted
Present Continuous
I am gallanting
you are gallanting
he/she/it is gallanting
we are gallanting
you are gallanting
they are gallanting
Present Perfect
I have gallanted
you have gallanted
he/she/it has gallanted
we have gallanted
you have gallanted
they have gallanted
Past Continuous
I was gallanting
you were gallanting
he/she/it was gallanting
we were gallanting
you were gallanting
they were gallanting
Past Perfect
I had gallanted
you had gallanted
he/she/it had gallanted
we had gallanted
you had gallanted
they had gallanted
Future
I will gallant
you will gallant
he/she/it will gallant
we will gallant
you will gallant
they will gallant
Future Perfect
I will have gallanted
you will have gallanted
he/she/it will have gallanted
we will have gallanted
you will have gallanted
they will have gallanted
Future Continuous
I will be gallanting
you will be gallanting
he/she/it will be gallanting
we will be gallanting
you will be gallanting
they will be gallanting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gallanting
you have been gallanting
he/she/it has been gallanting
we have been gallanting
you have been gallanting
they have been gallanting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gallanting
you will have been gallanting
he/she/it will have been gallanting
we will have been gallanting
you will have been gallanting
they will have been gallanting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gallanting
you had been gallanting
he/she/it had been gallanting
we had been gallanting
you had been gallanting
they had been gallanting
Conditional
I would gallant
you would gallant
he/she/it would gallant
we would gallant
you would gallant
they would gallant
Past Conditional
I would have gallanted
you would have gallanted
he/she/it would have gallanted
we would have gallanted
you would have gallanted
they would have gallanted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gallant - a man who is much concerned with his dress and appearancegallant - a man who is much concerned with his dress and appearance
coxcomb, cockscomb - a conceited dandy who is overly impressed by his own accomplishments
macaroni - a British dandy in the 18th century who affected Continental mannerisms; "Yankee Doodle stuck a feather in his cap and called it macaroni"
adult male, man - an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman); "there were two women and six men on the bus"
2.gallant - a man who attends or escorts a woman
attendant, attender, tender - someone who waits on or tends to or attends to the needs of another
Adj.1.gallant - unflinching in battle or action; "a gallant warrior"; "put up a gallant resistance to the attackers"
brave, courageous - possessing or displaying courage; able to face and deal with danger or fear without flinching; "Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver but less daring"- Herman Melville; "a frank courageous heart...triumphed over pain"- William Wordsworth; "set a courageous example by leading them safely into and out of enemy-held territory"
2.gallant - lively and spirited; "a dashing hero"
spirited - displaying animation, vigor, or liveliness
3.gallant - having or displaying great dignity or nobilitygallant - having or displaying great dignity or nobility; "a gallant pageant"; "lofty ships"; "majestic cities"; "proud alpine peaks"
impressive - making a strong or vivid impression; "an impressive ceremony"
4.gallant - being attentive to women like an ideal knightgallant - being attentive to women like an ideal knight
courteous - characterized by courtesy and gracious good manners; "if a man be gracious and courteous to strangers it shows he is a citizen of the world"-Francis Bacon

gallant

adjective
2. courteous, mannerly, gentlemanly, polite, gracious, attentive, courtly, chivalrous He was a thoughtful, gallant and generous man.
courteous rude, churlish, impolite, discourteous, ill-mannered

gallant

adjective
2. Respectfully attentive, especially to women:
3. Characterized by elaborate but usually formal courtesy:
4. Full of polite concern for the well-being of others:
noun
A man amorously attentive to women:
Translations
شُجاع، باسِلفَخْم
galantnínádhernýstatečný
prægtigstrålendetapper
hugrakkurtignarlegur, glæsilegur
galantiškumasnarsanarsiainarsus
drosmīgsskaistsstalts

gallant

(o.f.)
A. [ˈgælənt] ADJ
1. (= brave) [warrior, officer] → gallardo; [effort] → valiente, noble
2. (= courteous) → galante, cortés
B. [gəˈlænt] Ngalán m

gallant

[ˈgælənt] adj
(= brave) → vaillant(e), brave
a gallant fight against illness → un combat courageux contre la maladie
(towards ladies)galant(e)

gallant

adj
(= courageous) person, effort, attempt, fighttapfer; gallant conductTapferkeit f
(= chivalrous) person, gestureritterlich
(liter, = showy) → prächtig
n (Hist, = suitor) → Galan m (old)

gallant

[ˈgælənt] adj (brave) → valoroso/a, prode; (towards ladies) → galante

gallant

(ˈgӕlənt) adjective
1. brave. a gallant soldier.
2. which looks splendid or fine. a gallant ship.
ˈgallantly adverb
ˈgallantry noun
1. bravery. He won a medal for gallantry.
2. politeness and attention to ladies. The young man was noted for gallantry.
References in classic literature ?
THE Gallant Crew at a life-saving station were about to launch their life-boat for a spin along the coast when they discovered, but a little distance away, a capsized vessel with a dozen men clinging to her keel.
Gaily bedight, A gallant knight, In sunshine and in shadow, Had journeyed long, Singing a song, In search of Eldorado.
If the gallant be unable to pay him, he is committed to prison, and continues there during the husband's pleasure, who, if he sets him at liberty before the whole fine be paid, obliges him to take an oath that he is going to procure the rest, that he may be able to make full satisfaction.
On the way he came upon a bush, his gallant horse cleared it, and almost before he had righted himself in his saddle he saw that he would immediately overtake the enemy he had selected.
He was in fact "shanghaied" aboard a gallant, gallant ship, and sailed for a far countree.
If I might so far presume as to offer a suggestion to my honourable and gallant friend, whose knowledge of naval matters far be it from me to impeach,' Eugene struck in with great deliberation, 'it would be, that to tip a whistle is to advertise mystery and invite speculation.
It might be palace without, but it was wigwam within; so that, between the stateliness of his mansion and the squalidness of his furniture, the gallant White Plume presented some such whimsical incongruity as we see in the gala equipments of an Indian chief on a treaty-making embassy at Washington, who has been generously decked out in cocked hat and military coat, in contrast to his breech-clout and leathern legging; being grand officer at top, and ragged Indian at bottom.
Circumstances of an imperious nature, which it is unnecessary to relate here, had prevented him from taking service with that gallant army which had fought the disastrous campaigns ending with the fall of Corinth, and he chafed under the inglorious restraint, longing for the release of his energies, the larger life of the soldier, the opportunity for distinction.
And so I could not bring myself to believe that such a gallant tale had been left maimed and mutilated, and I laid the blame on Time, the devourer and destroyer of all things, that had either concealed or consumed it.
Prince Edward was the first of the royal party to take the field, and as he issued from the castle with his gallant company, banners and pennons streaming in the breeze and burnished armor and flashing blade scintillating in the morning sunlight, he made a gorgeous and impressive spectacle as he hurled himself upon the Londoners, whom he had selected for attack because of the affront they had put upon his mother that day at London on the preceding July.
It was then merely the gallant tale of some hero's deeds listened to because it was a gallant tale.
The heralds finished their proclamation with their usual cry of ``Largesse, largesse, gallant knights