galleon


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gal·le·on

 (găl′ē-ən, găl′yən)
n.
A large three-masted sailing ship with a square rig and usually two or more decks, used from the 16th to the 18th century especially by Spain as a merchant ship or warship.

[Spanish galeon, from Old Spanish, augmentative of galea, galley, from Old French galie; see galley.]

galleon

(ˈɡælɪən)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a large sailing ship having three or more masts, lateen-rigged on the after masts and square-rigged on the foremast and mainmast, used as a warship or trader from the 15th to the 18th centuries
[C16: from Spanish galeón, from French galion, from Old French galie galley]

gal•le•on

(ˈgæl i ən, ˈgæl yən)

n.
a large sailing vessel of the 15th to the 17th centuries used as a fighting or merchant ship, square-rigged on the foremast and mainmast and generally lateen-rigged on one or two after masts.
[1520–30; < Sp galeón, augmentative of galea galley]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.galleon - a large square-rigged sailing ship with three or more mastsgalleon - a large square-rigged sailing ship with three or more masts; used by the Spanish for commerce and war from the 15th to 18th centuries
carack, carrack - a large galleon sailed in the Mediterranean as a merchantman
sailing ship, sailing vessel - a vessel that is powered by the wind; often having several masts
Translations
غَلْيون: سَفينَه حَرْبِيَّه
galéra
galeon
galleón
galeonas
galjona
galeona

galleon

[ˈgælɪən] Ngaleón m

galleon

[ˈgæliən] ngalion m

galleon

nGaleone f

galleon

[ˈgælɪən] ngaleone m

galleon

(ˈgӕliən) noun
in former times, a large, usually Spanish, sailing-ship.
References in classic literature ?
But, seeing that the treasure must fall into the enemy's hands, he burnt and scuttled every galleon, which went to the bottom with their immense riches.
However, money would not fail them, provided that their galleons, laden with gold and silver from America, once entered their ports.
It seems that an old bookworm who has a book and curio shop in Baltimore discovered between the leaves of a very old Spanish manuscript a letter written in 1550 detailing the adventures of a crew of mutineers of a Spanish galleon bound from Spain to South America with a vast treasure of "doubloons" and "pieces of eight," I suppose, for they certainly sound weird and piraty.
The galleon was washed high upon the beach where she went to pieces; but not before the survivors, who numbered but ten souls, had rescued one of the great chests of treasure.
But, before he returned, he was told of another Spanish ship, or galleon, which had been east away near Porto de la Plata.
They tell me there's a Spanish galleon there, and a Dutch warship, besides a score or more of fishing-boats.
The next day he returned to camp with the balance of his ingots, and when they were stored on board the cruiser Captain Dufranne said he felt like the commander of an old-time Spanish galleon returning from the treasure cities of the Aztecs.
A well-known poetical letter of the dramatist Francis Beaumont to Jonson celebrates the club meetings; and equally well known is a description given in the next generation from hearsay and inference by the antiquary Thomas Fuller: 'Many were the wit-combats betwixt Shakspere and Ben Jonson, which two I behold like a Spanish great galleon and an English man-of-war: Master Jonson, like the former, was built far higher in learning; solid, but slow in his performances; Shakespere, with the English man-of-war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Katherine's Dock, lying overshadowed and black like a quiet pool amongst rocky crags, through the venerable and sympathetic London Docks, with not a single line of rails in the whole of their area and the aroma of spices lingering between its warehouses, with their far-famed wine- cellars - down through the interesting group of West India Docks, the fine docks at Blackwall, on past the Galleons Reach entrance of the Victoria and Albert Docks, right down to the vast gloom of the great basins in Tilbury, each of those places of restraint for ships has its own peculiar physiognomy, its own expression.
Half-drawn up upon the beach lay an equal number of Spanish galleons, unmanned, for the country was still a virgin land behind a veil.
But the Spanish ships which attempted to board the Revenge, as they were wounded and beaten off, so always others came in their places, she having never less than two might galleons by her sides and aboard her.
I lost a battle in Spain, I have been defeated in Trieste, but my naval army in India will have taken some galleons, and my Mexican pioneers will have discovered some mine.