gallerygoer

gallerygoer

(ˈɡælərɪˌɡəʊə)
n
(Art Terms) a person visiting an art gallery, especially one who does so habitually
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Having finally gotten to see great art in person, I promptly became the passionate museum- and gallerygoer that I am today."
JED PERL, ART CRITIC FOR THE NEW/REPUBLIC, is a regular gallerygoer. He finds a lot to like, but for the past few years, he and many other art lovers have felt disoriented because "the shared assumptions about the nature of art that ought to bind together our variegated experiences are nowhere to be found." In assessing artistic value, markets have taken over the function that ideas used to have.
On my visit, Garcia's room was accentuated by the arrival of Pierre Huyghe's delegate to the exhibition: a figure perambulating the show as a gallerygoer wearing a mask of blindingly bright lightbulbs.
Here no scrap was glued or affixed: Had a gallerygoer walked by too quickly or had a gust of wind swept in from Sunset Boulevard, the colored fragments would have scattered.
Then there's "the Lion Queen," whose quest to remake her face in the image of a big cat so absorbed the preschool-age gallerygoer. Everything on that particular monitor is, in fact, about art.
"It's just like being back in school," a gallerygoer muttered grumpily, upon entering Gujarati artist Atul Dodiya's latest, much anticipated solo show, "Bako Exists.
Maybe the gallerygoer, who hears the increasingly hysterical text in her mind as she reads?
Konnemann's deadpan bifurcation of the gallery requires the gallerygoer to do double duty, asking whether one work can be put in the service of two radically divergent systems.
Working with his choice media of glasses and reflective mirrors, Justiniani employs magic realism in his immersive work consisting of hand-drawn images, sculpted and kinetic objects and a glass infinity wheel, which takes gallerygoers on a quest to plumb the mysteries of the universe.
Aware, perhaps, that gallerygoers have spent the day glancing furtively at the array of screens conditioning our lives, Genadry and Muracciole have deployed the work to coax visitors' eyes to pause and linger.
On opening night, the piece lived up to its title by functioning as a keg tap, bringing together alcohol-swilling gallerygoers and infusing Ziperstein's finely honed conceptual conceit with haptic utility.
Gallerygoers will also get to enjoy selections from his Italy series, including his romantic take on Venice.