galliot


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gal·li·ot

 (găl′ē-ət)
n.
Variant of galiot.

galliot

(ˈɡælɪət)
n
(Nautical Terms) a variant spelling of galiot

gal•i•ot

or gal•li•ot

(ˈgæl i ət)

n.
a small galley propelled by sails and oars.
[1325–75; Middle English galiote < Middle French < Medieval Latin galeota, diminutive of galea galley]
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References in classic literature ?
Having provided everything necessary for our journey, such as Arabian habits, and red caps, calicoes, and other trifles to make presents of to the inhabitants, and taking leave of our friends, as men going to a speedy death, for we were not insensible of the dangers we were likely to encounter, amongst horrid deserts, impassable mountains, and barbarous nations, we left Goa on the 26th day of January in the year 1624, in a Portuguese galliot that was ordered to set us ashore at Pate, where we landed without any disaster in eleven days, together with a young Abyssin, whom we made use of as our interpreter.
Besides, such is the breadth of the upper part of the front of his head, and such the tapering cut-water formation of the lower part, that by obliquely elevating his head, he thereby may be said to transform himself from a bluff-bowed sluggish galliot into a sharp-pointed New York pilot-boat.
On this I spoke to twelve Spaniards, all stout rowers, and such as could most easily leave the city; but it was no easy matter to find so many just then, because there were twenty ships out on a cruise and they had taken all the rowers with them; and these would not have been found were it not that their master remained at home that summer without going to sea in order to finish a galliot that he had upon the stocks.
Moreover we were afraid of meeting on that course one of the galliots that usually come with goods from Tetuan; although each of us for himself and all of us together felt confident that, if we were to meet a merchant galliot, so that it were not a cruiser, not only should we not be lost, but that we should take a vessel in which we could more safely accomplish our voyage.
“If-so-be, Mounsheer, you’d run alongside Mistress Pettybones, as the Squire Dickens was bidding ye, ‘tis my notion you’d have been grappled; in which case, d’ye see, you mought have been troubled in swinging clear agin in a handsome manner; for thof Miss Lizzy and the parson’s young ‘un be tidy little vessels, that shoot by a body on a wind, Mistress Remarkable is summat of a galliot fashion: when you once takes ‘em in tow, they doesn’t like to be cast off agin.”
Caprice***, the signature French dining experience led by Chef de Cuisine Guilluame Galliot and renowned for its incredible cave au fromage, has earned a third star in the new Guide.
Veyres, N., Danon, A., Aono, M., Galliot, S., Karibasappa, Y.B., Diet, A., Grandmottet, F., Tamaoki, M., Lesur, D., Pilard, S., Boitel-Conti, M., Sangwan-Norreel, B.S., Sangwan, R.S.
His definition of techniques, arts, language and rituals as all being acts that were 'effective' and 'traditional' (Mauss 2007[1947]:67-68, 1973[1935]:75) became the cornerstone of the anthropology of techniques (see Galliot 2015; Sigaut 2003).
Previous studies have documented regeneration of the nervous system in cnidarian medusae, but only in the lesser complex scypho- and hydromedusae (Hargitt, 1904; Galliot and Schmid, 2002; Bode, 2003).
Essa pratica persistiu ate as suas ultimas edicoes antigas, como testemunha a edicao Galliot du Pre (VILLON, 1532).
Pierre Bersuire, Le premier volume desgrans decades de Tytus Liuius (Paris: Galliot du Pre, 1530) fol.