gallows


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gal·lows

 (găl′ōz)
n. pl. gallows or gal·lows·es
1.
a. A device usually consisting of two upright posts supporting a crossbeam from which a noose is suspended and used for execution by hanging; a gallows tree.
b. A similar structure used for supporting or suspending.
2. Execution by hanging: a crime punishable by the gallows.

[Middle English galwes, pl. of galwe, gallows, from Old English gealga, galga.]

gallows

(ˈɡæləʊz)
n, pl -lowses or -lows
1. a wooden structure usually consisting of two upright posts with a crossbeam from which a rope is suspended, used for hanging criminals
2. (Building) any timber structure resembling this, such as (in Australia and New Zealand) a frame for hoisting up the bodies of slaughtered cattle
3. the gallows execution by hanging
[C13: from Old Norse galgi, replacing Old English gealga; related to Old High German galgo]

gal•lows

(ˈgæl oʊz, -əz)

n., pl. -lows, -lows•es.
1. a wooden frame consisting of two upright timbers with a crossbeam from which condemned persons are hanged.
2. a similar structure from which something is suspended.
3. execution by hanging: a criminal sentenced to the gallows.
[before 900; Old English g(e)algan; c. OHG galgo]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gallows - an instrument of execution consisting of a wooden frame from which a condemned person is executed by hanging
gallous, gallows tree, gallows-tree, gibbet - alternative terms for gallows
hangman's halter, hangman's rope, hempen necktie, halter, hemp - a rope that is used by a hangman to execute persons who have been condemned to death by hanging
instrument of execution - an instrument designed and used to take the life of a condemned person
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one

gallows

noun scaffold, gibbet They were hanged at Smithfield gallows.
Translations
مِشْنَقَه
šibenice
galge
hirsipuu
vješala
akasztófa
gálgi
kartuvės
karātavas
vislice
galge
darağacıidam sehpası

gallows

[ˈgæləʊz]
A. NSING (gallowses or gallows (pl)) → horca f
B. CPD gallows humour N (fig) → humor m negro or macabro

gallows

[ˈgæləʊz] npotence f

gallows

nGalgen m; to send/bring somebody to the gallowsjdn an den Galgen bringen

gallows

:
gallows bird
n (inf)Galgenvogel m (inf)
gallows humour, (US) gallows humor
nGalgenhumor m

gallows

[ˈgæləʊz] nplforca, patibolo

gallows

(ˈgӕləuz) noun singular
a wooden frame on which criminals were hanged.
References in classic literature ?
The horns of the cross-trees were sawed off on the other side, so that this old top-mast looked not a little like a gallows. Perhaps I was over sensitive to such impressions at the time, but I could not help staring at this gallows with a vague misgiving.
So the chief of police ordered a gallows to be erected, and sent criers to proclaim in every street in the city that a Christian was to be hanged that day for having killed a Mussulman.
Presently he came to the market-place, and beheld thereon three gallows erected.
Well then, on this river there was a bridge, and at one end of it a gallows, and a sort of tribunal, where four judges commonly sat to administer the law which the lord of river, bridge and the lordship had enacted, and which was to this effect, 'If anyone crosses by this bridge from one side to the other he shall declare on oath where he is going to and with what object; and if he swears truly, he shall be allowed to pass, but if falsely, he shall be put to death for it by hanging on the gallows erected there, without any remission.' Though the law and its severe penalty were known, many persons crossed, but in their declarations it was easy to see at once they were telling the truth, and the judges let them pass free.
One of them said to the others, 'If we are caught, we shall be hanged on the gallows; how shall we set about it?' The other said, 'Do you see that large cornfield there?
'No, you gave it me for playing a tune to you.' said the countryman; but the judge told him that was not likely, and cut the matter short by ordering him off to the gallows.
That object was the gallows. Mrs Verloc was afraid of the gallows.
Are all the gallows' need: So with rope of shame the Herald came
He had asked for crawfish for his breakfast on the following morning; he intended to pass the day in making a small gallows and hang one of the finest of these fish in the middle of his room -- the red color evidently conveying an allusion to the cardinal -- so that he might have the pleasure of hanging Mazarin in effigy without being accused of having hung anything more significant than a crawfish.
Workmen dig, workmen hammer, soldiers laugh and sing; in the morning, by the fountain, there is raised a gallows forty feet high, poisoning the water."
"Because, you see, since I am mutineers' doctor, or prison doctor as I prefer to call it," says Doctor Livesey in his pleasantest way, "I make it a point of honour not to lose a man for King George (God bless him!) and the gallows."
"The gallows is a balance which has a man at one end and the whole earth at the other.