galumph


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ga·lumph

 (gə-lŭmf′)
intr.v. ga·lumphed, ga·lumph·ing, ga·lumphs
To move or run clumsily or heavily.

[Coined by Lewis Carroll in his poem "Jabberwocky" in Through the Looking-Glass, perhaps as a blend of gallop and triumph.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

galumph

(ɡəˈlʌmpf; -ˈlʌmf)
vb
(intr) informal to leap or move about clumsily or joyfully
[C19 (coined by Lewis Carroll): probably a blend of gallop + triumph]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ga•lumph

(gəˈlʌmf)
v.i.
to move along heavily and clumsily.
[1872; perhaps b. gallop and triumph]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

galumph


Past participle: galumphed
Gerund: galumphing

Imperative
galumph
galumph
Present
I galumph
you galumph
he/she/it galumphs
we galumph
you galumph
they galumph
Preterite
I galumphed
you galumphed
he/she/it galumphed
we galumphed
you galumphed
they galumphed
Present Continuous
I am galumphing
you are galumphing
he/she/it is galumphing
we are galumphing
you are galumphing
they are galumphing
Present Perfect
I have galumphed
you have galumphed
he/she/it has galumphed
we have galumphed
you have galumphed
they have galumphed
Past Continuous
I was galumphing
you were galumphing
he/she/it was galumphing
we were galumphing
you were galumphing
they were galumphing
Past Perfect
I had galumphed
you had galumphed
he/she/it had galumphed
we had galumphed
you had galumphed
they had galumphed
Future
I will galumph
you will galumph
he/she/it will galumph
we will galumph
you will galumph
they will galumph
Future Perfect
I will have galumphed
you will have galumphed
he/she/it will have galumphed
we will have galumphed
you will have galumphed
they will have galumphed
Future Continuous
I will be galumphing
you will be galumphing
he/she/it will be galumphing
we will be galumphing
you will be galumphing
they will be galumphing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been galumphing
you have been galumphing
he/she/it has been galumphing
we have been galumphing
you have been galumphing
they have been galumphing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been galumphing
you will have been galumphing
he/she/it will have been galumphing
we will have been galumphing
you will have been galumphing
they will have been galumphing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been galumphing
you had been galumphing
he/she/it had been galumphing
we had been galumphing
you had been galumphing
they had been galumphing
Conditional
I would galumph
you would galumph
he/she/it would galumph
we would galumph
you would galumph
they would galumph
Past Conditional
I would have galumphed
you would have galumphed
he/she/it would have galumphed
we would have galumphed
you would have galumphed
they would have galumphed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.galumph - move around heavily and clumsily; "the giant tortoises galumphed around in their pen"
bound, jump, leap, spring - move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

galumph

verb
To move heavily:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

galumph

[gəˈlʌmf] VI (hum) → brincar alegre pero torpemente, brincar como un elefante contento
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

galumph

vi (inf)trapsen (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Why have 13 million people already voted for this clown, this xenophobic, women-bashing, bomb-everything, fear-mongering galumph? I wonder.
That they galumph around London, plucking kids from orphanage windows as a latenight snack.
As did the scene where she tried to do her bit to help the love-lorn galumph of an English teacher prepare for a first date, but succeeded only in disastrously dying his hair "like an '80s snooker player's" just hours before the big moment.
As did the scene where she tried to do her bit to help the lovelorn galumph of an English teacher prepare for a first date, but succeeded only in disastrously dying his hair "like an '80s snooker player's" just hours before the big moment.
(Rosie is a huge galumph of a thing, with hair like a Rastafarian.
So you have this time to romp around, take risks, generally galumph and have abounding fun and delight.
Huxley said, the ability to perceive the world anew, with fresh perception, the temperament 'to face nature like a child.' This exuberance, this freshness and playfulness of mind and mood, the capacity to galumph, are surely things to try to hold on to.
"But unless there's a major public outcry, things arc going to galumph along the way they are."
When Alice asks Humpty Dumpty to explain the word slithy, he answers: "Well slithy means 'lithe and slimy.' You see, it's like a portmanteau--there are two meanings packed into one word." Dumpty later interprets mimsy: "Well, then, mimsy is 'flimsy and miserable' (there's another portmanteau for you)." Two words that appear later in "Jabberwocky" have become enshrined in dictionaries of the English language--chortle ("chuckle" + "snort") and galumph ("gallop" + "triumph").
(Thus, a seven-letter word in a solution might look something like "gALuMPh.") As a final condition, whereas solvers may select whichever letters they wish from the two underlined alphabets, solutions must include the two non-underlined alphabets in their entirety
Coming to the last, Big Buck's looked as if he had the legs of Punchestowns, only to galumph through the hurdle.